See also: UNISON

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English unisoun, from Middle French unisson, from Medieval Latin unisonus ‎(having the same sound), from Latin uni- + sonus ‎(sound).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈjunɨsən, -zən/

NounEdit

unison ‎(usually uncountable, plural unisons)

  1. The state of being together, in harmony, at the same time, as one, synchronized.
    Everyone moved in unison, but the sudden change in weight distribution capsized the boat.
  2. (music) The simultaneous playing of an identical note more than once.
    • 2007 July 16, James R. Oestreich, “With Levine as Tour Guide, a Journey Through Mahler’s Third Symphony”, in New York Times[1]:
      The young principal timpanist, Timothy Genis, was superb throughout, though his sidekick timpanist sometimes lagged in the final unisons.
    The unison has a pitch ratio of 1:1.

AbbreviationsEdit

  • (in music): P1

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

20.000 sjöngo unisont (1937), the sing-along at Skansen

AdjectiveEdit

unison (not comparable)

  1. in unison (of song)
    unison sång
    sing-along

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of unison
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular unison
Neuter singular unisont
Plural unisona
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 unisone
All unisona
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.
Read in another language