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See also: Weet

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English weten, a Middle English variant of witen (to know). More at wit.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

weet (third-person singular simple present weets, present participle weeting, simple past and past participle weeted)

  1. (archaic) To know.
    • Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra, Act I, Scene I, 37-41:
      The nobleness of life / Is to do thus, when such a mutual pair / And such a twain can do ’t, in which I bind, / On pain of punishment, the world to weet / We stand up peerless.
    • 1885, Richard Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night, Night 13:
      I wept for myself, but resigned my soul to the tyranny of Time and Circumstance, well weeting that Fortune is fair and constant to no man.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch weten (to know), from Middle Dutch weten, from Old Dutch witan, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see, know). Related to the English wit.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

weet (present weet, present participle wetende, past wis, past participle geweet)

  1. to know
  2. to be aware of

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːt
  • IPA(key): /ʋeːt/

NounEdit

weet m (plural weten, diminutive weetje n)

  1. knowledge; science.
  2. (archaic) notice; advertisement.

VerbEdit

weet

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of weten
  2. imperative of weten
  3. singular past indicative of wijten

AnagramsEdit


LimburgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *wit, from Proto-Germanic *wet, *wit. A rare example of the old dual pronoun surviving into a modern West Germanic language.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

weet

  1. nominative dual of ich

LuxembourgishEdit

Middle DutchEdit

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian hwēte, wēt, from Proto-Germanic *hwaitijaz.

NounEdit

weet c (plural weten)

  1. wheat

Further readingEdit

  • weet (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011