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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ich, from Old English , iċċ (I, pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *ik, *ek (I, pronoun), from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂ (I). See also ch-, I.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ich

  1. (personal, obsolete) I.
    • 1529, John Skelton, Elynour Rummyng:
      "Behold," she sayd, "and se How bright I am of ble! Ich am not cast away, That can my husband say, [...]"
    • 1561, John Awdelay, The fraternitye of vacabondes:
      My maysters, ich am an old man, and halfe blinde, []
    • 1568, Thomas Howell, Arbor of Amitie:
      With cap and knee, ich will serve thee, what should ich more declare.
    • 1604, William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure:
      Kissyng and lying ich see is all one:
      And chave no mony, chul tell true therfore.
    • 1645, Thomas Davies, The Somersetshire Man's Complaint:
      Dost thinke 'chill labor to be poore, No no, ich haue a-doe..Ich will a plundering too.
    • 1706, Edward Phillips, The New World of English Words:
      Ich, a Word us'd for I in the Western Parts of England.

Usage notesEdit

Ich was the form of I found in the dialects of the West Country, West Midlands, and Kent. It began to disappear from written English with the onset of the Chancery Standard in the 15th century, yet continued to see limited use through the middle of the 19th century.

The Northern dialectal form, ik (which derives from the same Old English root), likewise disappeared from writing with the onset of the Chancery Standard in the 15th century.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of ichthyophthiriasis.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ich (uncountable)

  1. (ichthyology) Ichthyophthiriasis, a parasitic infection of freshwater fish caused by the ciliate Ichthyophthirius.
    • 1996, Edward J. Noga, Fish Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment, Iowa State University Press (2000), →ISBN, page 95:
      Ich is one of the most common diseases of freshwater fish.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ich, from Old High German ih, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik. Cognate with German ich, Dutch ik, English I, ich, Icelandic ég.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Lower Alemannic (Northern Alsace)) IPA(key): /iʃ/, /eʃ/, /iː/ (i -> unstressed pronoun, used after the verb -> Hiit hàw *i* dìs g'màcht (Today I have done this), BUT it is always "ìch" before the verb, never the plain "i")


  • (Higher Alemannic (Southern Alsace)) IPA(key): /ix/, /ex/, /iː/ (unstressed)


  • (Zurich) IPA(key): /ix/, /i/ (unstressed), IPA(key): [ɪːx] (stressed)

PronounEdit

ich

  1. I

DeclensionEdit


Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • eich (Moselle Franconian, stressed)
  • ech (some dialects of Ripuarian; Moselle Franconian, unstressed, enclitic)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ich, from Old High German ih, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. The expected form is ech; the variant ich is from a form *īh with expressive lengthening (compare the corresponding diphthong in Moselle Franconian).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /iɕ/, [iɕ]
    • IPA(key): [eɕ][əɕ][ɕ] (unstressed; enclitic before a consonant)
    • IPA(key): [ij] (enclitic before a vowel)
  • The enclitic pronunciation is used after verbs and conjunctions (unless the pronoun is stressed).

PronounEdit

ich

  1. (some dialects of Ripuarian, including Kölsch) I; nominative of the first-person singular personal pronoun
    Dat senn ich op däm Fotto.
    That’s I (or: me) in this photo.

CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ich (I). Cognate with German ich, English I.

PronounEdit

ich

  1. (Sette Comuni) I

InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “ich” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Crimean GothicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronounEdit

ich

  1. I
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq:
      Ich malthata. Ego dico.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ich, from Old High German ih, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪç/
  • (file)
  • (Austria)
    (file)

PronounEdit

ich

  1. I (first person singular nominative (subject) pronoun)

InflectionEdit

1Often capitalized, especially in letters

In contemporary German, the genitive forms of personal pronouns are restricted to formal style and are infrequent even here. They may be used

  • for the genitive object still found in a handful of verbs: Er erbarmte sich meiner. – "He had mercy on me". (Colloquially one would either use the dative case, or a prepositional object, or replace the verb with another.)
  • after the preposition statt ("instead of, in place of"): Er kam statt meiner in die Mannschaft. – "He joined the team in my place." This sounds antiquated, and an meiner Statt or an meiner Stelle is preferable (in which case meiner is not a genitive, but a form of the possessive determiner mein).

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • ich in Duden online

HunsrikEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ich, from Old High German ih, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ich

  1. I
    Ich sin en Fraa.
    I am a woman.

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


JakaltekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Mayan *iihk.

NounEdit

ich

  1. chili pepper

ReferencesEdit

  • Church, Clarence; Church, Katherine (1955) Vocabulario castellano-jacalteco, jacalteco-castellano[1] (in Spanish), Guatemala C. A.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, pages 18; 24

LimburgishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ih, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ich (personal)

  1. I

InflectionEdit

Singular Dual Plural
nominative ich, 'ch weet weer, v'r
genitive miener, miens ózzer ózzer
locative miches ózzes ózzes
dative[* 1] mir ós ós
accusative mich ós ós
  1. ^ Dative is nowadays obsolete, use accusative instead.

LuoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ich

  1. stomach

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English (I, pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *ek (I, pronoun), from Proto-Indo-European *egom (I), *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ich

  1. Alternative form of I

Usage notesEdit

  • Ich is the Southern and sometimes Midland form of I in Middle English, which corresponds to ik of the Northern dialect.

Middle High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ih, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik.

PronounEdit

ich

  1. (personal) I

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Alemannic German: ich, ig, i
    • Sensler: [iː][1]
    • Swabian: i
      • Sathmar Swabian: i
  • Bavarian: i
  • Central Franconian: ich, eich, ech
    • Hunsrückisch: äijsch
    • Moselle Franconian:
      • Saarland:
        • Britten: [æɪ̯ʃ], [ɪʃ][3]
    • Ripuarian:
  • East Central German:
  • East Franconian: i, iech
  • German: ich
  • Luxembourgish: ech
  • Rhine Franconian:
  • Vilamovian: ych
  • Yiddish: איך(ikh)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Schmutz, C., Haas, W. (2004) Senslerdeutsches Wörterbuch. Fribourg: Paulusverlag.
  2. ^ Altenhofen, Cléo Vilson. (1996) Hunsrückisch in Rio Grande do Sul: Ein Beitrag zur Beschreibung einer deutschbrasilianischen Dialektvarietät im Kontakt mit dem Portugiesischen. Stuttgart: Steiner.
  3. ^ "ich". In: Besse, Maria. (2004). Britter Wörterbuch. Losheim am See: Verein für Heimatkunde in der Gemeinde Losheim am See.
  4. ^ Online-Wörterbuch der Akademie för uns kölsche Sproch, Stichwort »ich« (URL).
  5. ^ Kelz, Heinrich P. (1971). Phonologische Analyse des Pennsylvaniadeutschen. Hamburg: Buske.

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ih. Compare German ich, Dutch ik, English I, Old Norse ek.

PronounEdit

ich

  1. I

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ich

  1. possessive pronoun for oni or one, namely their or theirs; indeclinable.

PronounEdit

ich

  1. genitive of oni; them
  2. genitive of one; them
  3. personal masculine accusative of oni; them

See alsoEdit


SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ich

(The genitive plural and accusative plural of on (he), ona (she), and one (it).)
  1. (possessive) their, theirs
  2. them

Further readingEdit

  • ich in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ich, from Old English (I, pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *ek (I, pronoun), from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂ (I). Compare obsolete English ich.

PronounEdit

ich

  1. I (first person singular pronoun)

See alsoEdit


Yucatec MayaEdit

NounEdit

ich (plural ichoʼob)

  1. (anatomy) eye
  2. face
  3. fruit