Last modified on 29 October 2014, at 12:17

-ach

See also: ach and ách

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish -ach, from Proto-Celtic *-ākos; compare Welsh -og.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ach (epicene)

  1. Forms nouns/adjectives from other nouns and adjectives with the sense of ‘person or thing connected or involved with, belonging to, having’.
    Nouns:
    Éire (Ireland) → Éireannach (Irish (person))
    Sasana (England) → Sasanach (English (person))
    Adjectives:
    bunús (basis) → bunúsach (basic)
    fearga (virile) → feargach (angry)
    Also:
    Éireannach (Irish (adj)), Sasanach (English (adj))

Usage notesEdit

  • Nouns in -ach are first declension (for males) and second declension (for females).
  • Adjectives in -ach are first declension.

Derived termsEdit


Middle WelshEdit

SuffixEdit

-ach

  1. forms a comparative adjective

Derived termsEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • -ech (slender form)

SuffixEdit

-ach

  1. Forming nouns from nouns and adjectives with the sense of ‘person or thing connected or involved with, belonging to, having’.

DescendantsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Rudolf Thurneysen, A Grammar of Old Irish (Dublin, 1946), §347

Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ach (plural -aich or -aichean)

  1. Forming nouns from nouns and adjectives with the sense of ‘person or thing connected or involved with, belonging to, having’.
    Eireannach, Albannach, Frangach, Lochlannach, sàmhach, beathach

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh -ach.

SuffixEdit

-ach

  1. Forms a comparative of an adjective of one or two syllables.

Usage notesEdit

Triggers fortition on the final consonant of the adjective, changing b/d/g to p/t/c.

Derived termsEdit