EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English oure, from Old English ūre, ūser (our), from Proto-Germanic *unseraz (of us, our), from Proto-Indo-European *no-s-ero- (our). Cognate with West Frisian ús (our), Low German uns (our), Dutch onze (our), German unser (our), Danish vor (our).

PronunciationEdit

(UK)
(US)
(Australia)

PronounEdit

our (possessive pronoun)

  1. (attributive) Belonging to us.
    • 2008, Mike Knudson & Steve Wilkinson, Raymond and Graham Rule the School
      Paying no attention to Lizzy, Mrs. Gibson began calling out our names in alphabetical order.
    • 2013 July-August, Stephen P. Lownie, David M. Pelz, “Stents to Prevent Stroke”, American Scientist: 
      As we age, the major arteries of our bodies frequently become thickened with plaque, a fatty material with an oatmeal-like consistency that builds up along the inner lining of blood vessels.
  2. Of, from, or belonging to the nation, region, or language of the speaker.
    • 1992, Rudolf M. Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, page viii
      Thirdly, I continue to attempt to interdigitate the taxa in our flora with taxa of the remainder of the world.
  3. (Northern England, Scotland) Used before a person's name to indicate that the person is in one's family, or is a very close friend.
    I'm going to see our Terry for tea.

TranslationsEdit

See AlsoEdit

StatisticsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) ur

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ōra.

NounEdit

our m (plural ours)

  1. (Surmiran) edge, margins
Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 05:59