Last modified on 20 August 2014, at 22:24

-id

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant of -oid.

SuffixEdit

-id

  1. (not productive except in zoology) of or pertaining to; appended to various foreign words to make an English adjective or noun form. Often added to words of Greek, sometimes Latin, origin.
Derived termsEdit
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French -ide, French -ide, and their sources, Latin -id-, -is and Ancient Greek -ιδ-, -ις (-id-, -is).

SuffixEdit

-id

  1. (chiefly botany, astronomy) Forming nouns from Latin or Greek roots, including certain plant names modelled on Latin sources, the names of meteors (e.g. Perseid), and the names of certain dynasties (e.g. Solomonid).

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-id

  1. your ... -s (second-person singular informal possessive suffix denoting plural possession)
    kapu (gate) → a kapuid (your gates)
    palota (palace) → a palotáid (your palaces)
    érme (coin) → az érméid (your coins)

DeclensionEdit

For back vowel words:

For front vowel words:

Usage notesEdit

  • (possessive suffix): Member of the following suffix cluster:
    -id is added to words ending in a vowel except -i. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-.
    -aid is added to back vowel words ending in a consonant
    -eid is added to front vowel words ending in a consonant
    -jaid is added to back vowel words ending in a consonant or the vowel -i
    -jeid is added to front vowel words ending in a consonant or the vowel -i

See alsoEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-id

  1. Forms a noun of agency.
    • from verb or verbal noun
      e.g. serc (love) → sercaid (lover)
    • from noun
      e.g. mucc (pig) → muccaid (swineherd)
      ainmm (name) → ainmmnid (nominative case) = "namer"

Usage notesEdit

  • This suffix forms i-stem nouns.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Rudolf Thurneysen, A Grammar of Old Irish (Dublin, 1946), §267