Last modified on 22 July 2014, at 23:40

plane

See also: Plane

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin planum (flat surface), a noun use of the neuter of planus (plain). The word was introduced in the seventeenth century to distinguish the geometrical senses from the other senses of plain.

AdjectiveEdit

plane (comparative planer, superlative planest)

  1. Of a surface: flat or level.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

plane (plural planes)

  1. A level or flat surface.
  2. (geometry) A flat surface extending infinitely in all directions (e.g. horizontal or vertical plane).
  3. A level of existence or development. (eg, astral plane)
  4. A roughly flat, thin, often moveable structure used to create lateral force by the flow of air or water over its surface, found on aircraft, submarines, etc.
  5. (computing, Unicode) Any of a number of designated ranges of sequential code points.
  6. (anatomy) An imaginary plane which divides the body into two portions.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French, from Late Latin plana (planing tool), from plano (to level)

NounEdit

a rabbet plane

plane (plural planes)

  1. (countable) A tool for smoothing wood by removing thin layers from the surface.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

plane (third-person singular simple present planes, present participle planing, simple past and past participle planed)

  1. (transitive) To smooth (wood) with a plane.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviated from aeroplane.

NounEdit

plane (plural planes)

  1. An airplane; an aeroplane.
    • 2013 September 6, Tom Cheshire, “Solar-powered travel”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 13, page 34: 
      The plane is travelling impossibly slowly – 30km an hour – when it gently noses up and leaves the ground. With air beneath them, the rangy wings seem to gain strength; the fuselage that on the ground seemed flimsy becomes elegant, like a crane vaunting in flight. It seems not to fly, though, so much as float.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

plane (third-person singular simple present planes, present participle planing, simple past and past participle planed)

  1. (nautical) To move in a way that lifts the bow of a boat out of the water.
  2. To glide or soar.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old French plane, from Latin platanus, from Ancient Greek πλάτανος (plátanos), from πλατύς (platús, wide, broad).

NounEdit

plane (plural planes)

  1. (countable, botany) A deciduous tree of the genus Platanus.
  2. (Northern UK) A sycamore.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plane

  1. feminine form of plan

VerbEdit

plane

  1. first-person singular present indicative of planer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of planer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of planer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of planer
  5. second-person singular imperative of planer

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

plane

  1. First-person singular present of planen.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of planen.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of planen.
  4. Imperative singular of planen.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From plānus (intelligible, clear).

AdverbEdit

plānē (not comparable)

  1. distinctly, intelligibly
  2. wholly, quite, thoroughly
  3. (in answering) certainly, absolutely, by all reason, beyond a doubt

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • plane in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plane

  1. singular definite of plan
  2. plural form of plan

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

plane

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of plan.