Last modified on 18 October 2014, at 03:40

profit

See also: Profit

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English profit, from Old French profit (French: profit)., from Latin profectus (advance, progress, growth, increase, profit), from proficere (to go forward, advance, make progress, be profitable or useful); see proficient.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

profit (plural profits)

  1. Total income or cash flow minus expenditures. The money or other benefit a non-governmental organization or individual receives in exchange for products and services sold at an advertised price.
    • Rambler
      Let no man anticipate uncertain profits.
    • 2013 June 22, “T time”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68: 
      The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them, which is then licensed to related businesses in high-tax countries, is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies. […] current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate […] “stateless income”: profit subject to tax in a jurisdiction that is neither the location of the factors of production that generate the income nor where the parent firm is domiciled.
  2. (dated, literary) Benefit, positive result obtained.
    Reading such an enlightening book on the subject was of much profit to his studies.
    • Bible, 1 Corinthians vii. 35
      This I speak for your own profit.
    • Shakespeare
      if you dare do yourself a profit and a right
  3. (law) In property law, a nonpossessory interest in land whereby a party is entitled to enter the land of another for the purpose of taking the soil or the substance of the soil (coal, oil, minerals, and in some jurisdictions timber and game).

Usage notesEdit

Regarding the income sense, when the difference is negative the term loss is correct. Negative profit does appear in microeconomics. Profit by a government agency is called a surplus.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

profit (third-person singular simple present profits, present participle profiting, simple past and past participle profited)

  1. (transitive) To benefit (somebody), be of use to (somebody).
    • Bible, Hebrews iv. 2
      The word preached did not profit them.
    • Dryden
      It is a great means of profiting yourself, to copy diligently excellent pieces and beautiful designs.
  2. (intransitive, construed with from) To benefit, gain.
  3. (intransitive, construed with from) To take advantage of, exploit, use.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit



FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin prōfectus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

profit m (plural profits)

  1. profit, benefit
    Il a su tirer profit de ses connaissances.
    He managed to take advantage of his knowledge.

External linksEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French profit, from Latin profectus (advance, progress, growth, increase, profit).

NounEdit

profit m (plural profits)

  1. profit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /prǒfiːt/
  • Hyphenation: pro‧fit

NounEdit

pròfīt m (Cyrillic spelling про̀фӣт)

  1. profit

DeclensionEdit