Last modified on 6 September 2014, at 20:25
See also: Rack and Räck

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See Dutch rekken

NounEdit

rack (plural racks)

  1. A series of one or more shelves, stacked one above the other
  2. Any of various kinds of frame for holding clothes, bottles, animal fodder, mined ore, shot on a vessel, etc.
  3. (nautical) A piece or frame of wood, having several sheaves, through which the running rigging passes; called also rack block.
  4. A distaff.
  5. A bar with teeth on its face, or edge, to work with those of a wheel, pinion, or worm, which is to drive or be driven by it.
  6. A device used to torture victims by stretching them beyond their natural limits.
    • Macaulay
      During the troubles of the fifteenth century, a rack was introduced into the Tower, and was occasionally used under the plea of political necessity.
  7. A pair of antlers (as on deer, moose or elk).
  8. A cut of meat involving several adjacent ribs.
    I bought a rack of lamb at the butcher's yesterday.
  9. (billiards, snooker, pool) A hollow triangle used for aligning the balls at the start of a game.
    See [1]
  10. (slang) A woman's breasts.
    You should see her rack. Her tits are amazing, and so are her mother's!
  11. (climbing, caving) A friction device for abseiling, consisting of a frame with 5 or more metal bars, around which the rope is threaded. Also rappel rack, abseil rack.
  12. (climbing, slang) A climber's set of equipment for setting up protection and belays, consisting of runners, slings, karabiners, nuts, Friends, etc.
    I used almost a full rack on the second pitch.
  13. An instrument for bending a bow.
  14. A grate on which bacon is laid.
  15. (obsolete) That which is extorted; exaction.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir E. Sandys to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. To place in or hang on a rack.
  2. To torture (someone) on the rack.
    • Alexander Pope
      He was racked and miserably tormented.
    • 2011, Thomas Penn, Winter King, Penguin 2012, p. 228:
      As the poet Sir Thomas Wyatt later recalled, his father, Henry VII's jewel-house keeper Henry Wyatt, had been racked on the orders of Richard III, who had sat there and watched.
  3. To cause (someone) to suffer pain.
    • Milton
      Vaunting aloud but racked with deep despair.
  4. (figuratively) To stretch or strain; to harass, or oppress by extortion.
    • Shakespeare
      Try what my credit can in Venice do; / That shall be racked even to the uttermost.
    • Spenser
      The landlords there shamefully rack their tenants.
    • Fuller
      They rack a Scripture simile beyond the true intent thereof.
  5. (billiards, snooker, pool) To put the balls into the triangular rack and set them in place on the table.
  6. (slang) To strike a male in the groin with the knee.
  7. To (manually) load (a round of ammunition) from the magazine or belt into firing position in an automatic or semiautomatic firearm.
  8. (mining) To wash (metals, ore, etc.) on a rack.
  9. (nautical) To bind together, as two ropes, with cross turns of yarn, marline, etc.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Old English reċċan (to stretch out, extend)

VerbEdit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. stretch joints of a person
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Probably from Old Norse reka (to be drifted, tost)[1]

VerbEdit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. To fly, as vapour or broken clouds
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

rack (uncountable)

  1. Thin, flying, broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapour in the sky.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
    • Francis Bacon
      The winds in the upper region, which move the clouds above, which we call the rack, [] pass without noise.
    • Charles Kingsley
      And the night rack came rolling up.

Etymology 4Edit

Middle English rakken

VerbEdit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. (brewing) To clarify, and thereby deter further fermentation of, beer, wine or cider by draining or siphoning it from the dregs.
    • Francis Bacon
      It is in common practice to draw wine or beer from the lees (which we call racking), whereby it will clarify much the sooner.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

See rack (that which stretches), or rock (verb).

VerbEdit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. (of a horse) To amble fast, causing a rocking or swaying motion of the body; to pace.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

NounEdit

rack (plural racks)

  1. A fast amble.

Etymology 6Edit

See wreck.

NounEdit

rack (plural racks)

  1. (obsolete) A wreck; destruction.
    • Samuel Pepys
      All goes to rack.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ rack in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

AnagramsEdit