Last modified on 5 December 2014, at 01:23

sleep

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sleep, sleepe, from Old English slǣp (sleep), from Proto-Germanic *slēpaz (sleep), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lāb- (to hang loosely, be limp, be languid). Cognate with West Frisian sliep (sleep), Saterland Frisian Släipe (sleep), Low German Slaap (sleep), Dutch slaap (sleep), German Schlaf (sleep), Russian сла́бый (slábyj, weak).

The verb is from Middle English slepen, from Old English slǣpan (to sleep), from Proto-Germanic *slēpaną (to sleep), from the same root as the noun.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sleep (countable and uncountable, plural sleeps)

  1. (uncountable) The state of reduced consciousness during which a human or animal rests in a daily rhythm.
    I really need some sleep.
    We need to conduct an overnight sleep test to diagnose your sleep problem.
  2. (countable, informal) An act or instance of sleeping.
    I’m just going to have a quick sleep.
  3. (uncountable) Rheum found in the corner of the eyes after waking, whether real or a figurative objectification of sleep (in the sense of reduced consciousness).
    Wipe the sleep from your eyes.
  4. A state of plants, usually at night, when their leaflets approach each other and the flowers close and droop, or are covered by the folded leaves.
    • 1843, Joh Müller, ‎John Bell, Elements of Physiology (page 808)
      The daily sleep of plants, and their winter sleep, present in this respect exactly similar phenomena []

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sleep (third-person singular simple present sleeps, present participle sleeping, simple past and past participle slept)

  1. (intransitive) To rest in a state of reduced consciousness.
    You should sleep 8 hours a day.
  2. (intransitive) (Of a spinning top) to spin on its axis with no other perceptible motion.
    • 1854, Anne E. Baker, Glossary of Northamptonshire Words and Phrases
      A top sleeps when it moves with such velocity, and spins so smoothly, that its motion is imperceptible.
    When a top is sleeping, it is spinning but not precessing.
  3. (transitive) To accommodate in beds.
    This caravan can sleep up to four people.
  4. (transitive) To be slumbering in (a state).
    to sleep a dreamless sleep
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tennyson to this entry?)
  5. To be careless, inattentive, or unconcerned; not to be vigilant; to live thoughtlessly.
    • Atterbury
      We sleep over our happiness.
  6. To be dead; to lie in the grave.
    • Bible, 1 Thessalonians iv. 14
      Them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him.
  7. To be, or appear to be, in repose; to be quiet; to be unemployed, unused, or unagitated; to rest; to lie dormant.
    a question sleeps for the present; the law sleeps
    • Shakespeare
      How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank!

Derived termsEdit

TroponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Category:Sleep

ReferencesEdit

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sleep m (plural slepen, diminutive sleepje n)

  1. (the act of) dragging, towing
  2. train: the part of wedding gown that drags behind the bride

VerbEdit

sleep

  1. singular past indicative of slijpen
  2. first-person singular present indicative of slepen
  3. imperative of slepen

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English slǣp.

NounEdit

sleep (plural sleeps)

  1. sleep

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit