scroll

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A diminutive of Old English scroue, scrowe, Late Latin scroa scroll, probably of Teutonic origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scroll (plural scrolls)

  1. A roll of paper or parchment; a writing formed into a roll; a schedule; a list.
  2. (architecture) An ornament formed of undulations giving off spirals or sprays, usually suggestive of plant form. Roman architectural ornament is largely of some scroll pattern.
  3. A mark or flourish added to a person's signature, intended to represent a seal, and in some States allowed as a substitute for a seal. [U.S.] Alexander Mansfield Burrill.
  4. Scroll-shaped end of a violin.
  5. (geometry) a skew surface.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

scroll (third-person singular simple present scrolls, present participle scrolling, simple past and past participle scrolled)

  1. (computing, transitive) To change one's view of data on a computer's display, typically using a scroll bar or a scroll wheel.
    She scrolled the offending image out of view.
  2. (intransitive) To move in or out of view horizontally or vertically.
    The rising credits slowly scrolled off the screen.
  3. (Internet, intransitive) To flood a chat system with numerous lines of text, causing legitimate messages to scroll out of view before they can be read.
    Hey, stop scrolling!
    • 1998, "rOOth", Brain's chat (on newsgroup alt.music.queen)
      It's cool but i know why I prefer newsgroups : I just got banned for scrolling or summat : i was typing one word in each message so pppl[sic] could read it cos it was going so fast - geez.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 12:57