U+B5A1, 떡
HANGUL SYLLABLE DDEOG
Composition: + +
Dubeolsik input:E-j-r

[U+B5A0]
Hangul Syllables
[U+B5A2]

KoreanEdit

 
(tteok, “rice-dough cake”).

Etymology 1Edit

First attested in the Worin seokbo (月印釋譜 / 월인석보), 1459, as Middle Korean ᄯᅥᆨ〮 (Yale: sték).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?tteok
Revised Romanization (translit.)?tteog
McCune–Reischauer?ttŏk
Yale Romanization?ttek

South Gyeongsang (Busan) pitch accent: / 에 /

Syllables in red take high pitch. This word always takes high pitch and also heightens the next suffixed syllable, unless it is 에.

NounEdit

(tteok)

  1. Any dough of rice or other cereals, ground before, or mashed after, steaming.
  2. Specifically, a steamed cake of glutinous rice, often sweetened.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Of native Korean origin. Perhaps derived directly from (ttak).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?tteok
Revised Romanization (translit.)?tteog
McCune–Reischauer?ttŏk
Yale Romanization?ttek

IdeophoneEdit

(tteok)

  1. (of a gap, of a width) very widely, very broadly
    어깨 펼쳐져 있다.
    Eokkaega tteok pyeolchyeojyeo itda.
    His shoulders are spread very broadly.
  2. (of two things, also metaphoric) very tightly, in a perfectly fitting manner (often negative)
    밥풀 붙어 있다.
    Bappuri ose tteok buteo itda.
    Grains of rice are stuck tight to his clothes.
  3. while being immobile; (metaphoric) in an adult manner; intransigently (often negative)
    군인 버티고 있다.
    Gunindeuri tteok beotigo itda.
    The troops are intransigently blocking the way.
Usage notesEdit

(tteok) is the yin vowel, or dark vowel, form of (ttak).

In contemporary Korean, the yin vowels refer to /ʌ/, /e/, /u/, and often /i/. In Korean ideophones and sensory words, forms with these vowels have a connotation of darkness, largeness, murkiness, bluntness, old age, or negativeness.