U+B5A1, 떡
HANGUL SYLLABLE DDEOG
Composition: + +

[U+B5A0]
Hangul Syllables
[U+B5A2]




떄 ←→ 떼

KoreanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
(tteok, “rice-dough cake”).

First attested in the Worin seokbo (月印釋譜 / 월인석보), 1459, as Middle Korean ᄯᅥᆨ〮 (Yale: sték). Japanese (しとぎ) (shitogi, sacrificial Shinto rice cake) is often given as a Koreanic borrowing into Japanese;[1][2] also compare Ainu シト (sito, dumpling made from rice or millet).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?tteok
Revised Romanization (translit.)?tteog
McCune–Reischauer?ttŏk
Yale Romanization?ttek
  • South Gyeongsang (Busan) pitch accent: / 에 /

    Syllables in red take high pitch. This word always takes high pitch and also heightens the next suffixed syllable, unless it is 에.

NounEdit

(tteok)

  1. rice cake; tteok
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?tteok
Revised Romanization (translit.)?tteog
McCune–Reischauer?ttŏk
Yale Romanization?ttek

IdeophoneEdit

Ablaut/harmonic pair
Yin-form (tteok)
Yang-form (ttak)

(tteok)

  1. (of a gap, of a width) wide, broad
    어깨 펼쳐져 있다.
    Eokkae-ga tteok pyeolcheojeo itda.
    His shoulders are spread very broadly.
  2. (of two things, also metaphoric) tight, fitting manner (usually negative)
    밥풀 붙어 있다.
    Bap'pur-i os-e tteok buteo itda.
    Grains of rice are stuck tight to his clothes.
  3. immobile; (metaphoric) in an adult manner; intransigent (often negative)
    군인 버티고 있다.
    Gunin-deur-i tteok beotigo itda.
    The troops are stubbornly blocking the way.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Martin, Samuel E. (1996) Consonant Lenition in Korean and the Macro-Altaic Question, Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi Press, →ISBN, page 45
  2. ^ Frellesvig, Bjarke (2010) A History of the Japanese Language, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 147