Open main menu

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French intransigeant, from Spanish intransigente, from Latin in- (un-, not) + trānsigēns, present participle of trānsigō (to come to an understanding), from trāns (across) +‎ agō (to do).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈtɹæn.sə.d͡ʒənt/, /ɪnˈtɹæn.zə.d͡ʒənt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: in‧tran‧si‧gent

AdjectiveEdit

intransigent (comparative more intransigent, superlative most intransigent)

  1. Unwilling to compromise or moderate a position; unreasonable
    Don't waste your time trying to change his mind: he's completely intransigent.
    • Herbert Feigl:
      Since I have been asked to do this in very brief compass, the harsh tone and terse style of my presentation will make my contentions appear more dogmatic and intransigent than I should wish them to be.[1]

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

intransigent (plural intransigents)

  1. A person who is intransigent

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Feigl, H. Inquiries and Provocations: Selected Writings. Is Science Relevant to Theology? →ISBN

Further readingEdit