See also: сь and съ

RussianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

SuffixEdit

-сь (-sʹ)

  1. contraction of -ся (-sja) (reflexive suffix appended to finite verbs and infinitives to make a reflexive, reciprocal, or intransitive verb)
Usage notesEdit
  • After a vowel, -ся is usually contracted to -сь, except when attached to an adverbial participle:
    • мы́ться (mýtʹsja, to wash oneself), мо́ется (mójetsja, [she] washes herself)
    • мо́юсь (mójusʹ, [I] wash myself)
    • мы́вшаяся (mývšajasja, [who had] washed herself).

Etymology 2Edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sь (this). Doublet of сий (sij), a borrowing from Old Church Slavonic. See also сей (sej), the inherited independent form.

SuffixEdit

-сь (-sʹ)

  1. this, last (found in a few, mostly obsolete or dialectal, terms referring to time)
    лони́ (loní, year) (dialectal) + ‎-сь (-sʹ) → ‎лони́сь (lonísʹ, last year) (dialectal)
    вчера́ (včerá, yesterday) + ‎-сь (-sʹ) → ‎вчера́сь (včerásʹ, yesterday) (colloquial)
    дне- (dne-, day) + ‎-сь (-sʹ) → ‎днесь (dnesʹ, now) (obsolete)
    ле́то (léto, year, summer) + ‎-сь (-sʹ) → ‎ле́тось (létosʹ, last year, last summer) (low colloquial)

UkrainianEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Polish .

ParticleEdit

-сь (-sʹ)

  1. Appended to relative/interrogative pronouns to form indefinite pronouns

Derived termsEdit