See also: aire, Aire, airé, and aíre

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

By analogy with millionaire, which was, in turn, borrowed from French millionnaire.

SuffixEdit

-aire

  1. One whose wealth exceeds a specific number of units in the local currency.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin -ator.

SuffixEdit

-aire

  1. Used to make nouns describing occupations from nouns.
    llenya (firewood) + ‎-aire → ‎llenyataire (lumberjack)
    terrissa (pottery) + ‎-aire → ‎terrissaire (potter)
  2. Used to make adjectives describing interests or characteristics from verbs.
    xerrar (to chat) + ‎-aire → ‎xerraire (chatty)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Semi-learned borrowing from Latin -ārium, the accusative of -ārius; or (in the feminine) from -āria. Compare the inherited doublet of -ier/-ière.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-aire m or f (plural -aires)

  1. -ary (nominal suffix)
  2. -aire

SuffixEdit

-aire (plural -aires)

  1. -ary (adjectival suffix)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • -ire (following a slender consonant)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish -aire, from Old French -aire, ultimately from Latin -ārius.

SuffixEdit

-aire m

  1. -er, -or (agentive suffix)

Usage notesEdit

  • This suffix forms masculine nouns of the fourth declension.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


OccitanEdit

SuffixEdit

-aire m (feminine -aira)

  1. -er; suffix used to form agent nouns.
    dançar (to dance) + ‎-aire → ‎dançaire (dancer)

Derived termsEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French [Term?], ultimately from Latin -ārius.

SuffixEdit

-aire m

  1. Agentive affix, similar to English -er, -or

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: -aire
  • Scottish Gaelic: -air