English edit

Noun edit

aire (countable and uncountable, plural aires)

  1. Obsolete spelling of air

Anagrams edit

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin aēr, āeris.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaiɾe/, [ˈai̯.ɾe]

Noun edit

aire m (plural aires)

  1. air

Basque edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish aire.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ai̯ɾe/, [ai̯.ɾe̞]

Noun edit

aire inan

  1. air (mixture of gasses)

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • "aire" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus
  • aire” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], euskaltzaindia.eus

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin āēr.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

aire m (plural aires)

  1. air (mixture of gases)
  2. wind, breeze
  3. air (manner)
    Té un aire de salutIt looks healthy.
  4. (equestrianism) gait
  5. (music) air, tune

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old French aire, eire, from Latin ārea. Doublet of are and area, which were learned borrowings.

Noun edit

aire f (plural aires)

  1. (geometry) (surface) area
    Synonym: superficie
  2. (architecture) a flat surface
  3. (sailing) direction of the wind
  4. threshing floor
  5. area, zone, range (a space in which a certain thing occurs)
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Probably from Latin ager, agrum (and hence a doublet of ager, a later borrowing), or related to the above. Compare Old Occitan agre (bird's nest).

Noun edit

aire f (plural aires)

  1. eyrie, aerie

Verb edit

aire

  1. inflection of airer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular present imperative

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese aire (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin aēr, aeris.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

aire m (plural aires)

  1. air
    • c. 1295, R. Lorenzo, editor, La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla, Ourense: I.E.O.P.F, page 108:
      Et algũu mouro astroso, que sabe fazer estas cousas, fezo aquela uisom vijr pelo aere por nos espantar cõ esta arteria.
      And some despicable Moor, who knows how to do this things, made this vision that came by the air, to scare us with this trick
  2. evil eye

Derived terms edit

References edit

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Irish aire f (guarding, watching over)[5]

Noun edit

aire f (genitive singular aire)

  1. care, attention
  2. heed, notice
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Irish aire,[6] from Proto-Celtic *aryos, of disputed origin (see Old Irish entry for more).

Noun edit

aire m (genitive singular aireach, nominative plural aireacha)

  1. (literary) nobleman, chief, freeman
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Noun edit

aire m (genitive singular aire, nominative plural airí)

  1. (government) minister
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
aire n-aire haire t-aire
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 86, page 46
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 187, page 93
  3. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume II, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 26
  4. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 75, page 32
  5. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 aire (‘act of guarding, watching over’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  6. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “3 aire (‘nobleman, chief’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From a +‎ ire.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /aˈi.re/
  • Rhymes: -ire
  • Hyphenation: a‧ì‧re

Noun edit

aire m (uncountable) (literary)

  1. impulse, start (of a motion)
    Synonyms: (literary) abbrivo, avvio, rincorsa, slancio, spinta
    dare l'aire a qualcosato put something into motion (literally, “to give the start to something”)
    prendere l'aireto start moving (literally, “to take the start”)

Etymology 2 edit

Variant of aere.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaj.re/
  • Rhymes: -ajre
  • Hyphenation: ài‧re

Noun edit

aire m (plural airi)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of aere

Anagrams edit

Ladino edit

Etymology edit

From Latin āēr.

Noun edit

aire m (Latin spelling)

  1. air, wind
    Synonym: airi (Monastir)

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French air,aer, from Latin āēr, from Ancient Greek ἀήρ (aḗr).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

aire (plural aires)

  1. air

Descendants edit

  • English: air
  • Scots: air
  • Yola: aare

References edit

Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin āēr.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

aire m (plural aires)

  1. air (mixture of gases)

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

Variant of air.

Noun edit

aire oblique singularm (oblique plural aires, nominative singular aires, nominative plural aire)

  1. appearance; semblance
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin acer.

Adjective edit

aire m (oblique and nominative feminine singular aire)

  1. Alternative form of aigre

References edit

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

Originally a io-stem (as shown by the dative plural form airib and the personal name Lóegaire (literally favorite nobleman) with vocative and genitive Lóegairi), later reanalyzed as a k-stem due to conflation with the synonymous airech. From Proto-Celtic *aryos (compare Gaulish personal names with Ario-, such as Ario-manus and Ario-vistus), of unknown origin.

  • Historically (since the now-defunct derivation of Adolphe Pictet, 1858) speculated to mean "freeman", and furthermore supposed to be related to Indo-Iranian *áryas (via Proto-Indo-European *h₂éryos). This idea was especially popular in the 19th- and early 20th-century context of "Aryan" race and language theory, which posited Aryans as "noble" "freemen" opposed to slave-like दास (dāsa)/Semites. Today, for linguistic reasons, any attempt to find a European cognate for the Indo-Iranian autonym is treated with extreme skepsis. See *áryas for details.
  • According to Meid, it is from Proto-Indo-European *pr̥h₃- (first) (Sanskrit पूर्व (pūrvá), Ancient Greek πρῶτος (prôtos), Lithuanian pirmas). According to Matasović this is less convincing because there are no traces of the laryngeal in the purported Celtic reflexes: *pr̥h₃yos would have given *ɸrāyos. See ro-.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

aire m (genitive airech, nominative plural airig)

  1. freeman (whether commoner or noble)
  2. noble (as distinct from commoner)

Declension edit

Masculine k-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative aire airigL airig
Vocative aire airigL airecha
Accusative airigN airigL airecha
Genitive airech airech airechN
Dative airigL airechaib, airib airechaib, airib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
aire unchanged n-aire
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: ai‧re

Verb edit

aire

  1. inflection of airar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Scots edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

aire (plural aires)

  1. Alternative form of air (small quantity)

References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

aire (plural aires)

  1. Orkney, Shetland form of air (beach)

References edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish aire f (freeman, noble).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

aire f (genitive singular aire)

  1. mind
    Tha rudeigin air a h-aire.There's something on her mind.
  2. attention, heed, notice
  3. care, regard
    Thoiribh an aire oiribh!Take care of yourselves!

Synonyms edit

  • (attention, regard): suim

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
aire n-aire h-aire t-aire
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Spanish edit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈaiɾe/ [ˈai̯.ɾe]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -aiɾe
  • Syllabification: ai‧re

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Latin āēr, from Ancient Greek ἀήρ (aḗr).

Noun edit

aire m (plural aires)

  1. air (the substance constituting earth's atmosphere)
  2. air (the open space above the ground)
  3. air; wind
    Synonym: viento
  4. air (a feeling or sense)
  5. resemblance (to another person)
  6. (usually in the plural) air (pretension; snobbishness)
    darse airesto put on airs
  7. air (a sense of poise, graciousness, or quality)
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit

Interjection edit

aire

  1. get out; begone; away!

Etymology 2 edit

From zorá (drunken), named by a zoologist after the shivering movements by the animal's head.

Noun edit

aire m (plural aires)

  1. solenodon
    Synonym: almiquí

References edit

  • Sitzungsberichte: Biologische Wissenschaften und Erdwissenschaften, Volumes 191-192, p. 225

Further reading edit