See also: iad and IAD

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Based on Iliad.

SuffixEdit

-iad

  1. Forming the name of an epic about the indicated topic.
    The Athletiad, The Congressiad, The Female Dunciad, The Mooriad, The Popiad, The Rapiad, The Scribleriad
    • 1798, James Lovell Moore, The Columbiad: an epic poem on the discovery of America and the West Indies by Columbus, in twelve books

Etymology 2Edit

Based on Olympiad,[1] and perhaps also influenced by the common ending iad on units of time formed by suffixing -ad to words ending in -ium, e.g. decenniad.

SuffixEdit

-iad

  1. (rare) A period of time from one occurrence of an (indicated, regularly recurrent) event to the next.
    • 1871, Walt Whitman, Democratic Vistas, page 28:
      Acrid the temper of the parties, vital the pending questions. Congress convenes; the President sends his Message; Reconstruction is still in abeyance; the nominations and the contest for the twenty-first Presidentiad draw close, [...]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ John Algeo, Adele S. Algeo, Fifty Years Among the New Words: A Dictionary of Neologisms 1941-1991 (1993, →ISBN), page 6

AnagramsEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

SuffixEdit

-iad m (plural -iadau)

  1. show the action of a verb or its result
    caru (to love) + ‎-iad → ‎cariad (love)
    penodi (to appoint) + ‎-iad → ‎penodiad (appointment)
    dehongli (to interpret) + ‎-iad → ‎dehongliad (interpretation)

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Brythonic *-ad, from earlier *-atus, a late (British) variant of *-ātus, used to form verbal nouns from Celtic ā-stem verbs. The -i- is secondary. Cognate with Cornish -yas.

SuffixEdit

-iad m (plural -iaid)

  1. suffix indicating an agent noun: -er, -or
    dal (to hold) + ‎-iad → ‎deiliad (holder)
    lladd (to kill) + ‎-iad → ‎lleiddiad (assassin; killer whale)
  2. person who comes from somewhere or is classed by something, -ian, -ist
    Israel (Israel) + ‎-iad → ‎Israeliad (Israeli; Israelite)
    Rhufain (Rome) + ‎-iad → ‎Rhufeiniad (Roman)
    amldduw (polythesistic) + ‎-iad → ‎amldduwiad (polythesist)

Derived termsEdit


ReferencesEdit

  • -iad”, in R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, 1950–present