See also: ich, Ich, ICH, ích, ịch, and -ich-

German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Principally from Latin -iacum, itself from Celtic. However, other names were sometimes adapted to the suffix, as in Limperich (now a district of Bonn), which goes back to Middle High German Lintberg.

Pronunciation edit

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. Placename suffix found in the Rhineland.

Related terms edit

Middle Dutch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Dutch -ig, from Proto-West Germanic *-g, from Proto-Germanic *-īgaz, *-agaz, *-ugaz.

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Dutch: -ig

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. Alternative form of -yssh

Etymology 2 edit

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. Alternative form of -y (-y)

Pennsylvania German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German -ec, -ic, from Old High German -ig, from Proto-Germanic *-gaz, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos. Compare German -ig, Dutch -ig, English -y, Swedish -ig.

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. (adjectival) -y

Saterland Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian -ich, from Proto-Germanic *-īgaz, variant of *-gaz, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos. Compare German and Dutch -ig, English -y.

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. -y

Scottish Gaelic edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish -igidir (whence also Irish -igh), originally a denominative verb formative, from Proto-Celtic *-sagyetor; compare Welsh -hau.

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. Suffix used to form verbs; semi-productive in Scottish Gaelic.

Conjugation edit

Participles
Tense \ Voice Active Passive
Present a' -igh --
Past -ich -icheadh
Future -ichidh -ichear
Conditional -icheadh -ichteadh

Derived terms edit

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian -ich, from Proto-Germanic *-īgaz, variant of *-gaz, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos.

Suffix edit

-ich

  1. -y

Further reading edit

  • -ich”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011