See also: ig, Ig, IG, ig., ig-, and i.G.

DanishEdit

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch -ag, -ig, from Proto-Germanic *-agaz, *-īgaz, *-ugaz, each a variant of a common suffix *-gaz, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns
    Synonyms: -achtig, -erig
  2. -ed, having (when attached to a noun preceded by an adjective that describes the noun)
    roodharigred-haired
    dikhuidigthick-skinned
    tweebenigtwo-legged

InflectionEdit

Inflection of -ig
uninflected -ig
inflected -ige
comparative -iger
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial -ig -iger het -igst
het -igste
indefinite m./f. sing. -ige -igere -igste
n. sing. -ig -iger -igste
plural -ige -igere -igste
definite -ige -igere -igste
partitive -igs -igers

Derived termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German -ec, -ic, from Old High German -ig, from Proto-West Germanic *-g, from Proto-Germanic *-gaz, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪç/ (Germany; less common in southern regiolects)
  • IPA(key): /ɪk/, /ɪɡ̊/, /iɡ̊/ (most common form in southern Germany, Austria, and Switzerland)
  • IPA(key): /ɪɕ/, /ɪʃ/ (all central German dialects)
  • (file)

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns
  2. forms adjectives from verbs, well doing
  3. forms adjectives from adverbs

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


HungarianEdit

Pronominal adverbs from case suffixes (cf. postpositions)
case suffix who? what? this that he/she
(it)*
v. pr. c.
nom. ki mi ez az ő* / Ø
az / Ø
acc. -t / -ot /
-at / -et / -öt
kit mit ezt azt őt* / Ø
azt / Ø
c1
c2
dat. -nak / -nek kinek minek ennek annak neki neki- c
ins. -val / -vel kivel mivel ezzel/
evvel
azzal/
avval
vele (vele-) c
c-f. -ért kiért miért ezért azért érte c
tra. -vá / -vé kivé mivé ezzé azzá c
ter. -ig meddig eddig addig c
e-f. -ként (kiként) (miként) ekként akként c
e-m. -ul / -ül c
ine. -ban / -ben kiben miben ebben abban benne c
sup. -n/-on/-en/-ön kin min ezen azon rajta (rajta-) c
ade. -nál / -nél kinél minél ennél annál nála c
ill. -ba / -be kibe mibe ebbe abba bele bele- c
sub. -ra / -re kire mire erre arra rá- c
all. -hoz/-hez/-höz kihez mihez ehhez ahhoz hozzá hozzá- c
el. -ból / -ből kiből miből ebből abból belőle c
del. -ról / -ről kiről miről erről arról róla c
abl. -tól / -től kitől mitől ettől attól tőle c
*: Ő and őt refer to human beings; the forms below them might be
construed likewise. – Forms in parentheses are uncommon. All »

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. (case suffix) until, till, up to. Used to form the terminative case. It can refer to both time and place. It is used by both back and front vowel words.
    Ötig dolgozom.I work until five o'clock.
    Az állomásig busszal mentünk, de onnan hazáig már gyalog.We traveled by bus to the station but from there to home we walked.
  2. for a specified length of time
    A levél olyan hosszú volt, hogy tíz percig olvastam.The letter was so long that I was reading it for 10 minutes.

Usage notesEdit

  • The above two senses may be ambiguous when hour or o'clock is mentioned, as in this sentence:
    Két óráig maradunk.We'll stay for two hours OR We'll stay until 2 o'clock.
To avoid this ambiguity, the accusative case may be employed when referring to the duration (Két órát maradunk), and the sentence may be rephrased when referring to the end point (Két óra múlva indulunk – We're leaving in two hours.)
  • (until): With pointlike events or places the meaning is usually clear. However, it is ambiguous when the given event itself lasts for some time or the given object is such that it matters whether it is included, excluded or partially included.
    Szerdáig van időd.You have time until Wednesday.
    • With exclusion: on Wednesday 00:01 A.M. you are already late (rare, one would probably say keddig; until Tuesday)
    • With partial inclusion: the border line is somewhere during the day (most likely)
    • With full inclusion: you have the full Wednesday (also possible)

See alsoEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. Alternative form of -y

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From -ugr, Old Norse -igr (-y), from *-ugaz, Proto-Germanic *-īgaz (-y), from *-gaz (-y), from Proto-Indo-European *-kos, *-ḱos (-y). Certain words also from Low German -ig (-y) or German -ig (-y), from Middle High German -ec, -ic, from Old High German -ig, from Proto-West Germanic *-g, from Proto-Germanic *-gaz (-y), from Proto-Indo-European *-kos (-y).

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “inherited from Old Norse or derived from Middle Low German loanwords?”)

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns

Derived termsEdit


OjibweEdit

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. A suffix denoting the third person singular to first- or second-person singular form of a transitive animate verb (vta)

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *-ag.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-iġ

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns and verbs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: -iȝ, -i, -y, -ich

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *-gaz, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos.

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. -y; forms adjectives from i-stem nouns and verbs

Related termsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse -agr, -igr, from Proto-Germanic *-gaz, from Proto-Indo-European *-kos.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. -y; forms adjectives from nouns

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *-ikos. Cognate with Cornish -ik, Breton -ig, Proto-Germanic *-igaz, Ancient Greek -ικός (-ikós), Latin -icus.[1]

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ig

  1. diminutive suffix, -let
    afon (river) + ‎-ig → ‎afonig (rivulet)
    barwn (baron) + ‎-ig → ‎barwnig (baronet)
    oen (lamb) + ‎-ig → ‎oenig (small ewe lamb)
  2. person or object with characteristics of the root word
    lloer (moon) + ‎-ig → ‎lloerig (lunatic)
    ysgol (school) + ‎-ha + ‎-ig → ‎ysgolhaig (scholar)
    calan (first day of the year) + ‎-ig → ‎calennig (New Year's gift)
  3. forms adjectives from nouns, -y
    gwenwyn (poison) + ‎-ig → ‎gwenwynig (poisonous)
    pwys (weight, pound) + ‎-ig → ‎pwysig (important)
    Gwyddel (Irish man) + ‎-ig → ‎Gwyddelig (Irish)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

-edig (forms adjectives from verbs)

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “-ig”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 153 i 9