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See also: glas, glás, and glas'

Contents

Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German glas, from Old High German glas, from Proto-Germanic *glasą. Cognate with German Glas, Dutch glas, English glass.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Glas n (plural Gleser, diminutive Glesli)

  1. glass (material)
  2. glass (drinking vessel)
  3. pane of glass

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German glas, gles, from Proto-Germanic *glasą, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰel- (to shine, glimmer, glow). Compare Low German Glas, Dutch glas, English glass, Icelandic gler.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡlaːs/ (standard)
  • IPA(key): /ɡlas/ (variant in Low German areas; but inflected forms always with a long vowel)
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aːs, -as

NounEdit

Glas n (genitive Glases, plural Gläser or Glas, diminutive Gläschen n or Gläslein n)

  1. (material) glass
  2. (container) glass
    • 1931, Arthur Schnitzler, Flucht in die Finsternis, S. Fischer Verlag, page 36:
      Ein frisch gefülltes Glas Champagner stand vor ihm. Er trank es in einem Zug aus – mit Lust, fast mit Begier.
      A freshly filled glass of champaign was in front of him. He emptied it in one draught – with pleasure, almost with greed.
  3. (container) jar (made of glass)
    • 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 31:
      So wurden im Garten noch die letzten Stachelbeeren und Himbeeren, wurden schon frühe Pflaumen und Pfirsiche gepflückt; in der Küche weckte Mamsell das viele Obst und Gemüse in unzähligen Gläsern ein; […]
      So even the last gooseberries and raspberries and already early plums and peaches were plucked in the garden; in the kitchen the housekeeper canned all this large amount of fruits and vegetables in countless jars; […]
  4. (amount of liquid) glass

Usage notesEdit

  • The normal plural is Gläser.
  • The unchanged plural Glas can be used, alternatively, after numerals when referring to a quantity of drinks someone has drunk (or served, etc.): Mein Vater trinkt jeden Abend fünf Glas Bier. – “My father has five glasses of beer every night.”

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

Glas n (genitive Glases, plural Glasen)

  1. (nautical) time stamp for half an hour

DeclensionEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German glas, from Proto-Germanic *glasą. Cognate with German Glas, Dutch glas, English glass.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Glas n (plural Glieser)

  1. (uncountable) glass (material)
  2. glass (drinking vessel)
  3. (plural Glas) glass (amount of liquid)
  4. jar (made of glass)