See also: junge

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • Jung (colloquial, regional)

EtymologyEdit

Nominalisation of jung (young). Already occasionally in Middle High German, later fully nominalised with the invariable nominative ein Junge (instead of ein Junger). The recognition as the normal standard term for “boy” is based on Central and Low German usage and has only fully asserted itself during the 20th century (compare Knabe). The now quite common plural form Jungs (Jungens) is also from German Low German. Cognate with English young (n.).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈjʊŋə/
  • (file)

NounEdit

Junge m (genitive Jungen, plural Jungen or Jungs or Jungens, diminutive Jünglein n or Jüngelchen n or Jüngchen n)

  1. boy
  2. (card games) jack

Usage notesEdit

  • The normal plural in writing is Jungen, although the colloquial Jungs is also sometimes seen.
  • The third plural Jungens is not all too frequent and chiefly restricted to northern and (parts of) central Germany.
  • Even with the irregular plurals (Jungs, Jungens) the singular declension is always weak (thus with -n in the oblique cases of the singular).

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

NounEdit

Junge

  1. inflection of Junges:
    1. strong nominative/accusative plural
    2. weak nominative/accusative singular

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


German Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

Junge m

  1. boy

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.