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See also: median, médian, medían, and medián

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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Media +‎ -n.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Median (not comparable)

  1. Relating to Media or Medes. [from 16th c.]
  2. (obsolete) Of laws, rules etc.: unchanging, invariable. [17th-19th c.]
    • 1835, Edgar Allan Poe, ‘King Pest’:
      ‘This proceeding,’ interposed the president, ‘is by no means in accordance with the terms of the mulct or sentence, which is in its nature Median, and not to be altered or recalled.’
    • 1856, Richard F. Burton, First Footsteps in East Africa, Könemann 2000, p. 50:
      And if you venture to object to these Median laws, – as I am now doing, – you elicit a chorus of disapproval, and acquire some evil name.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Median (plural Medians)

  1. a Mede
  2. The northwestern Old Iranian language of the Medes, attested only by numerous loanwords in Old Persian, few borrowings in Old Armenian and some glosses in Ancient Greek; nothing is known of its grammar.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

 
German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Median m

  1. median (statistics: measure of central tendency)

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit