Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/-Hō

This Proto-Indo-European entry contains reconstructed terms and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Indo-European edit

Alternative reconstructions edit

Reconstruction edit

In literature this morpheme might be referred to as "Hoffmann's suffix". It is often reconstructed with a *h₃ on the basis of the voice assimilation in the word *h₂ábh₃on- < *h₂ep-h₃on- (river), although some authorities might also reconstruct an unspecified laryngeal, *H. Sometimes identified with the root *h₃enh₂- (onerate).

Suffix edit

*-Hō[2][3]

  1. Derives adjectives, nouns indicating possession, denoting burden, authority.

Inflection edit

Athematic, amphikinetic
masculine feminine
nominative *-Hō *-Hénih₂
genitive *-Hnés *-Hn̥yéh₂s
masculine singular dual plural
nominative *-Hō *-Honh₁(e) *-Hones
vocative *-Hon *-Honh₁(e) *-Hones
accusative *-Honm̥ *-Honh₁(e) *-Honm̥s
genitive *-Hnés *? *-HnóHom
ablative *-Hnés *? *-Hn̥mós
dative *-Hnéy *? *-Hn̥mós
locative *-Hén, *-Héni *? *-Hn̥sú
instrumental *-Hnéh₁ *? *-Hn̥mís
feminine singular dual plural
nominative *-Hénih₂ *-Hénih₂h₁(e) *-Hénih₂es
vocative *-Hénih₂ *-Hénih₂h₁(e) *-Hénih₂es
accusative *-Hénih₂m̥ *-Hénih₂h₁(e) *-Hénih₂m̥s
genitive *-Hn̥yéh₂s *? *-Hn̥yéh₂oHom
ablative *-Hn̥yéh₂s *? *-Hn̥yéh₂mos
dative *-Hn̥yéh₂ey *? *-Hn̥yéh₂mos
locative *-Hn̥yéh₂, *-Hn̥yéh₂i *? *-Hn̥yéh₂su
instrumental *-Hn̥yéh₂h₁ *? *-Hn̥yéh₂mis
neuter singular dual plural
nominative *-Hon *-Honih₁ *-Hō
vocative *-Hon *-Honih₁ *-Hō
accusative *-Hon *-Honih₁ *-Hō
genitive *-Hnés *? *-HnóHom
ablative *-Hnés *? *-Hn̥mós
dative *-Hnéy *? *-Hn̥mós
locative *-Hén, *-Héni *? *-Hn̥sú
instrumental *-Hnéh₁ *? *-Hn̥mís

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Hellenic:
  • Indo-Iranian:
  • Italic:
    • Latin: (see there for further descendants)

References edit

  1. ^ Clackson, James, Indo-European Word Formation: Proceedings from the International Conference, 2002
  2. ^ Fortson, Benjamin W. (2004) Indo-European Language and Culture: An Introduction, first edition, Oxford: Blackwell, page 111
  3. ^ Ringe, Donald (2006) From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Germanic (A Linguistic History of English; 1)‎[1], Oxford: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 63