See also: Single

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English numbers (edit)
10
1 2  →  10  → 
    Cardinal: one
    Ordinal: first
    Latinate ordinal: primary
    Adverbial: one time, once
    Multiplier: onefold
    Latinate multiplier: single
    Distributive: singly
    Collective: onesome
    Multiuse collective: singlet
    Greek or Latinate collective: monad
    Greek collective prefix: mono-
    Latinate collective prefix: uni-
    Fractional: whole
    Elemental: singlet
    Greek prefix: proto-
    Number of musicians: solo
    Number of years: year

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English single, sengle, from Old French sengle, saingle, sangle, from Latin singulus, a diminutive derived from Proto-Indo-European *sem- (one). Akin to Latin simplex (simple). See simple, and compare singular.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

single (not comparable)

  1. Not accompanied by anything else; one in number.
    Synonyms: lone, sole
    • 2013 July-August, Fenella Saunders, “Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture”, in American Scientist:
      The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles, increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail. It’s therefore not surprising that most cameras mimic this arrangement.
    Can you give me a single reason not to leave right now?
    The vase contained a single long-stemmed rose.
  2. Not divided in parts.
    Synonyms: unbroken, undivided, uniform
    The potatoes left the spoon and landed in a single big lump on the plate.
  3. Designed for the use of only one.
    a single room
  4. Performed by one person, or one on each side.
    a single combat
  5. Not married, or (in modern times) not dating or married to anyone.
    Synonyms: unmarried, unpartnered, available
    Forms often ask if a person is single, married, divorced, or widowed. In this context, a person who is dating someone but who has never married puts "single".
    Josh put down that he was a single male on the dating website.
  6. (botany) Having only one rank or row of petals.
  7. (obsolete) Simple and honest; sincere, without deceit.
  8. Uncompounded; pure; unmixed.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick: Or, The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry after Truth, [], 2nd edition, London: [] John Clark and Richard Hett, [], Emanuel Matthews, [], and Richard Ford, [], published 1726, OCLC 1325830848:
      simple ideas are opposed to complex , and single ideas to compound.
    • 1867, William Greenough Thayer Shedd, Homiletics, and Pastoral Theology (page 166)
      The most that is required is, that the passage of Scripture, selected as the foundation of the sacred oration, should, like the oration itself, be single, full, and unsuperfluous in its character.
  9. (obsolete) Simple; foolish; weak; silly.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

single (plural singles)

  1. (music) A 45 RPM vinyl record with one song on side A and one on side B.
    Antonym: album
  2. (music) A popular song released and sold (on any format) nominally on its own though usually having at least one extra track.
    The Offspring released four singles from their most recent album.
  3. One who is not married or does not have a romantic partner.
    Antonym: married
    He went to the party, hoping to meet some friendly singles there.
  4. (cricket) A score of one run.
  5. (baseball) A hit in baseball where the batter advances to first base.
  6. (dominoes) A tile that has a different value (i.e. number of pips) at each end.
  7. (US, informal) A bill valued at $1.
    I don't have any singles, so you'll have to make change.
  8. (UK) A one-way ticket.
  9. (Canadian football) A score of one point, awarded when a kicked ball is dead within the non-kicking team's end zone or has exited that end zone.
    Synonym: (official name in the rules) rouge
  10. (tennis, chiefly in the plural) A game with one player on each side, as in tennis.
  11. One of the reeled filaments of silk, twisted without doubling to give them firmness.
  12. (UK, Scotland, dialect) A handful of gleaned grain.
  13. (computing, programming) A floating-point number having half the precision of a double-precision value.
    Coordinate term: double
    • 2011, Rubin H. Landau, A First Course in Scientific Computing (page 214)
      If you want to be a scientist or an engineer, learn to say “no” to singles and floats.
  14. (film) A shot of only one character.
    • 1990, Jon Boorstin, The Hollywood Eye: What Makes Movies Work (page 94)
      But if the same scene is shot in singles (or “over-the-shoulder” shots where one of the actors is only a lumpy shoulder in the foreground), the editor and the director can almost redirect the scene on film.
  15. A single cigarette.
  16. (rail transport, obsolete) Synonym of single-driver.
    • 1945 March and April, “Preserving Historic Locomotives”, in Railway Magazine, page 64:
      A few such examples have been preserved, as is well known, such as one of the Stirling 8-ft. singles of the late Great Northern Railway, the Great Western 4-4-0 City of Truro, ex-Caledonian single-driver No. 123, the Brighton 0-4-2 Gladstone, and others.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Finnish: sinkku
  • German: Single
  • Japanese: シングル (shinguru)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

single (third-person singular simple present singles, present participle singling, simple past and past participle singled)

  1. To identify or select one member of a group from the others; generally used with out, either to single out or to single (something) out.
    Eddie singled out his favorite marble from the bag.
    Yvonne always wondered why Ernest had singled her out of the group of giggling girls she hung around with.
    • 1915, Austen Chamberlain, speech on April 16, 1915
      Sir John French says that if he is to single out one regiment in the fighting at Ypres it is the Worcesters he would name? I do plead that some person should record these events, so that our history, national and local, may be the richer for them, that the children may be stimulated to do their duty by the knowledge of the way in which our soldiers are doing theirs to-day.
  2. (baseball) To get a hit that advances the batter exactly one base.
    Pedro singled in the bottom of the eighth inning, which, if converted to a run, would put the team back into contention.
  3. (agriculture) To thin out.
  4. (of a horse) To take the irregular gait called singlefoot.
    • 1860, William S. Clark, Massachusetts Agricultural College Annual Report
      Many very fleet horses, when overdriven, adopt a disagreeable gait, which seems to be a cross between a pace and a trot, in which the two legs of one side are raised almost but not quite, simultaneously. Such horses are said to single, or to be single-footed.
  5. (intransitive, archaic) To sequester; to withdraw; to retire.
  6. (intransitive, archaic) To take alone, or one by one; to single out.
  7. (transitive) To reduce (a railway) to single track.
    • 1959 June, “Talking of Trains: North Eastern report”, in Trains Illustrated, page 293:
      In the east of Yorkshire, Mr. A. M. Ross reports the belief of local railwaymen that the N.E.R. plans to single the York-Beverley line, leaving an adequate provision of passing loops, and to operate it by C.T.C. from York; []
    • 1962 October, “Talking of Trains: New signalbox at Twyford”, in Modern Railways, page 226:
      The Henley branch, recently singled and fully track-circuited, is worked by acceptance lever between Twyford and Shiplake cabins.
    • 2020 November 18, Paul Bigland, “New infrastructure and new rolling stock”, in RAIL, number 918, page 48:
      Sadly, it's not the quickest route as much of it has been singled, but it still boasts some attractive stations as well as an active Community Rail Partnership, one of the first in the country.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Number 1 2 3 4 5
Modifier single double / twofold triple / threefold quadruple / fourfold quintuple / pentuple / fivefold
Whole loner / singleton / monad pair / couple / twosome / dyad trio / threesome / triad / troika foursome / tetrad fivesome
Part only one / singlet twin / one of two / doublet triplet / one of three quadruplet / one of four quintuplet / pentuplet / one of five
Number 6 7 8 9 10
Modifier sextuple / hextuple / sixfold septuple / heptuple / sevenfold octuple / eightfold ninefold / nonuple tenfold / decuple
Whole sixsome sevensome eightsome ninesome tensome / decad
Part sextuplet / hextuplet / one of six one of seven / septuplet / heptuplet octuplet / one of eight one of nine / nonuplet one of ten / decuplet
Number 11 12 13 100 many
Modifier elevenfold / undecuple / hendecuple twelvefold / duodecuple thirteenfold / tredecuple a hundredfold / centuple multiple
Whole elevensome twelvesome thirteensome hundredsome
Part one of eleven / undecuplet / hendecuplet one of twelve / duodecuplet one of thirteen / tredecuplet one of a hundred / centuplet one of many / multiplet

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English single.

AdjectiveEdit

single (indeclinable)

  1. single (not in a relationship)
    Antonym: vergee

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English single.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

single m (plural singles)

  1. (music) single

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English single.

PronunciationEdit

  • (music record or track): IPA(key): /ˈsɪŋ.əl/, /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/
  • ((person) without romantic partner): IPA(key): /ˈsɪŋ.ɡəl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sin‧gle

NounEdit

single m (plural singles, diminutive singletje n)

  1. A single (short music record, e.g. 45 RPM vinyl with an A side and a B side; main track of such a record).
  2. A single (person without a romantic partner).

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

single (not comparable)

  1. single (without a romantic partner)

InflectionEdit

Inflection of single
uninflected single
inflected single
comparative
positive
predicative/adverbial single
indefinite m./f. sing. single
n. sing. single
plural single
definite single
partitive singles

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English single.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsiŋle/, [ˈs̠iŋle̞]
  • Rhymes: -iŋle
  • Syllabification(key): sing‧le

NounEdit

single

  1. single (45 rpm record; track nominally released on its own)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of single (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative single singlet
genitive singlen singlejen
partitive singleä singlejä
illative singleen singleihin
singular plural
nominative single singlet
accusative nom. single singlet
gen. singlen
genitive singlen singlejen
singleinrare
partitive singleä singlejä
inessive singlessä singleissä
elative singlestä singleistä
illative singleen singleihin
adessive singlellä singleillä
ablative singleltä singleiltä
allative singlelle singleille
essive singlenä singleinä
translative singleksi singleiksi
instructive singlein
abessive singlettä singleittä
comitative singleineen
Possessive forms of single (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person singleni singlemme
2nd person singlesi singlenne
3rd person singlensä

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

single m (plural singles)

  1. single room
  2. (music) single

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English single.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

single m or f by sense (invariable)

  1. single, loner (person who lives alone and has no emotional ties)

AdjectiveEdit

single (invariable)

  1. single (unmarried, not in a relationship)
    Synonym: (formal) celibe

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ single in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from English single and singles.

AdjectiveEdit

single

  1. plural of singel

NounEdit

single m (definite singular singlen, indefinite plural singler, definite plural singlene)

  1. (music) a single (record or CD)
    Synonym: singelplate
  2. (sports) singles (e.g. in tennis)

Etymology 2Edit

From singel.

VerbEdit

single (imperative single, present tense singler, simple past and past participle singla or singlet)

  1. to sprinkle or scatter shingle

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English single and singles.

NounEdit

single m (definite singular singlen, indefinite plural singlar, definite plural singlane)

  1. (music) a single (record or CD)
  2. (sports) singles (e.g. in tennis)

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English single.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

single m (plural singles)

  1. (music) single (song released on its own or with an extra track)

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English single. Doublet of singur.

NounEdit

single n (plural single-uri)

  1. single (album)

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English single. Doublet of sendos.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsinɡle/ [ˈsĩŋ.ɡle]
  • Rhymes: -inɡle
  • Syllabification: sin‧gle

NounEdit

single m (plural singles)

  1. single (song released)

NounEdit

single m or f (plural singles)

  1. single, single person

VerbEdit

single

  1. inflection of singlar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English single.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

single (definite accusative singleı, plural singlelar)

  1. (music) single

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative single
Definite accusative singleı
Singular Plural
Nominative single singlelar
Definite accusative singleı singleları
Dative singlea singlelara
Locative singleda singlelarda
Ablative singledan singlelardan
Genitive singleın singleların