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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French afermer, affermer, from Latin affirmare, adfirmare (to present as fixed, aver, affirm), from ad (to) + firmare (to make firm), from firmus (firm).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

affirm (third-person singular simple present affirms, present participle affirming, simple past and past participle affirmed)

  1. To agree, verify or concur; to answer positively.
    She affirmed that she would go when I asked her.
  2. To assert positively; to tell with confidence; to aver; to maintain as true.
    • Bible, Acts xxv. 19
      Jesus, [] whom Paul affirmed to be alive
  3. To support or encourage.
    They did everything they could to affirm the children's self-confidence.
  4. To make firm; to confirm, or ratify; especially (law) to assert or confirm, as a judgment, decree, or order, brought before an appellate court for review.

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit