See also: AKs, äks, åks, and aks'

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old English axian (ask); see ax for more.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

aks (third-person singular simple present aks or akses, present participle aksing, simple past and past participle aksed)

  1. (dialectal, now chiefly West Africa, African-American Vernacular and MLE) To ask.
    • 2004, Larry Dean Hamilton, A Gathering of Angels, page 132:
      Another thing, kid, don't aks me no more questions tonight.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ax.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aks n (singular definite akset, plural indefinite aks)

  1. ear (fruiting body of a grain plant)
  2. spike (ear of grain)

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch aex, from Old Dutch *acus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑks/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: aks
  • Rhymes: -ɑks

NounEdit

aks f (plural aksen)

  1. An axe, usually denoting a heavy axe.
    Synonym: bijl

Jamaican CreoleEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English ask.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑːks/, /ˈɔːks/
  • Hyphenation: aks

VerbEdit

aks

  1. ask
    • 2013, Loron-Jon Stokes, Citizen Class 5, →ISBN, page 267:
      “"Mi cyan gi'e teh yeh deh t'ings yeh aks fuh [...]”
      I can't give you the things you've asked for.
    Aks Teddy ef 'im a guh a farin nex' week.
    Ask Teddy if he's going to the USA next week.

Further readingEdit


Nigerian PidginEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English ask.

VerbEdit

aks

  1. ask

TsimshianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aks

  1. water

VerbEdit

aks

  1. (transitive, intransitive) drink
  2. (intransitive) be wet

ReferencesEdit

  • John Asher Dunn, Sm'algyax: A Reference Dictionary and Grammar (1995, →ISBN

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French axe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aks (definite accusative aksi, plural aksler)

  1. axis
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • aks in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu

WestrobothnianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse ax, from Proto-Germanic *ahsą.

NounEdit

aks n

  1. An ear (of corn.)[1][2][3]
  2. A barb (of hook.)[3]
  3. A tooth (of key.)[1][3]
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

aks

  1. Ears of corn remain on the field.[3]

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch actie, German Aktie, from Latin āctiō (action.)

NounEdit

aks n

  1. (finance) A share.[1][2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Lindgren, J. V., “ax n., aktie n.”, in Orbok över Burträskmålet, page 7, 2
  2. 2.0 2.1 Fältskytt, Gunnar, 2007, Ordbok över Lövångersmålet, →ISBN, →ISBN, page 159
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 Marklund, Thorsten, 1986, Skelleftemålet: grammatik och ordlista : för lekmän - av lekman [The Skellefteå speech: grammar and vocabulary: for laymen - by a layman], →ISBN, page 206