See also: ALM and Alm

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

alm

  1. (metrology) Symbol for attolumen, an SI unit of luminous flux equal to 10−18 lumens.

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from alms

NounEdit

alm (plural alms)

  1. (nonstandard) Something given to the poor as charity: a singular gift of alms.
    • 1992, Orlando B. Cuartocruz, Zamboanga Chabacano Folk Literature, page 26
      An alm to the poor is a work of charity. Una limosna a los pobres es obra de caridad.
    • 1992, Bobb Biehl, The Question Book, Thomas Nelson Publishers (→ISBN):
      If in doubt, you rarely go wrong giving an alm to the poor, and you might feel better about it.
    • 2015, Brennan Manning, The Ragamuffin Gospel, Multnomah (→ISBN), page 78:
      “An alm for the love of God,” cries the beggar. Don Juan stops, reaches in his pocket and holds out his last gold coin above the outstretched arms of the [beggar].
    • 2020, Melanie Dickerson, The Peasant's Dream, Thomas Nelson (→ISBN), page 99:
      He wanted to offer it to you, as an alm for the Church, but I told him you would never agree to that. But if you wish to pay one guilder per month, I think he would accept that.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Alm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

alm f (plural almen)

  1. alpine pasture [from mid 19th c.]
    • 1859, Heinrich Berghaus, Wat men van de aarde weet, en hoe men tot de kennis daarvan is gekomen, Vol. 3, tr. by P. van Os from German, Van Druten & Bleeker (publ.) page 229.
      Nu volgt weldra het drijven van het vee naar de alm.
      Now the driving of livestock to the alpine pasture soon follows.
    Synonym: alpenweide

HypernymsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse almr, from Proto-Germanic *elmaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁élem.

NounEdit

alm m (definite singular almen, indefinite plural almer, definite plural almene)

  1. an elm

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse almr. Akin to English elm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

alm m (definite singular almen, indefinite plural almar, definite plural almane)

  1. a wych-elm (Ulmus glabra)
  2. an elm, (a tree of the genus Ulmus)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse almr, from Proto-Germanic *elmaz, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁élem.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

alm c

  1. elm

DeclensionEdit

Declension of alm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative alm almen almar almarna
Genitive alms almens almars almarnas

AnagramsEdit


Zoogocho ZapotecEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish alma, from Latin anima.

NounEdit

alm

  1. soul

ReferencesEdit

  • Long C., Rebecca; Cruz M., Sofronio (2000) Diccionario zapoteco de San Bartolomé Zoogocho, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 38)‎[1] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., page 3