See also: APAn and apán

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

APA (amateur press association) +‎ -n (of or pertaining to)

Noun edit

apan (plural apans)

  1. (fandom slang) A member of an amateur press association.
    • 1990 August, Guy Lillian, “'Tis the Season”, in Mimosa[1], number 8, page 4:
      The greatest apan of all time lives on a quiet old street rising above Hagerstown, Maryland.
    • 1998 October 3, Brown, Rich [Dr Gafia], “Fan Terms (1)”, in rec.arts.sf.fandom[2] (Usenet), retrieved 2018-06-13, message-ID <19981003020622.14181.00000964@ng52.aol.com>:
      Most of the participants in the mundane apas are hobby printers—-and the disdain with which our fandom once viewed Xeroxing of fanzines is but a pale reflection of the way mundane apans have looked upon the mimeo and the ditto as a means of publishing "papers" (as they call their amateur publications).
    • 2006 May, Arnie Katz, “The Thin Veneer”, in confuSon[3], volume 1, number 4:
      I immediately began a cutback. I remained an enthusiastic apan, but by the time I gafiated around 1976, I was in only one, FAPA.

Synonyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Related terms edit

Anagrams edit

Cebuano edit

Etymology edit

Short for apanapan.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: a‧pan

Noun edit

apan

  1. A grasshopper.

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Finnish edit

Verb edit

apan

  1. first-person singular present indicative of appaa

Anagrams edit

Hiligaynon edit

Noun edit

apán

  1. an adult locust

Malay edit

Noun edit

apan

  1. (dialectal, Sambas) pan

Pipil edit

Etymology edit

From at (water) +‎ -pan (upper surface; place/area; time, locative).

Pronunciation edit

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈapaŋ/

Noun edit

apan (plural ajapan)

  1. river
    Yahquet maltiat tic ne apan ne pipilmet
    The children went to bathe in the river

Related terms edit

Quechua edit

Verb edit

apan

  1. third-person singular present indicative of apay

Swedish edit

Noun edit

apan

  1. definite singular of apa

Tagakaulu Kalagan edit

Noun edit

apan

  1. grasshopper

Waray-Waray edit

Noun edit

apán

  1. grasshopper

Western Huasteca Nahuatl edit

Noun edit

apan

  1. river

Yola edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English apan, upan, from Old English upon, uppon, uppan (on, upon, up to, against, after, in addition to).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /əˈpɔːn/, /əˈpɔː/, /ʊˈpɔːn/, /ʊˈpɔː/, /pɔː/

Preposition edit

apan

  1. upon
    • 1867, “THE WEDDEEN O BALLYMORE”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2, page 94:
      Wee aar lhaung vlealès an pikkès, to waaite apan a breede.
      With their long flails and picks, to wait upon the bride.
    • 1867, “THE WEDDEEN O BALLYMORE”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 3, page 94:
      Aar was a muskawn o buthther ee-laaide apan hoat shruaanès,
      There was a great heap of butter laid upon hot scraps,
    • 1867, “VERSES IN ANSWER TO THE WEDDEEN O BALLYMORE”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 98:
      [Wee] vaate apan vaate a met-borde was ee-halt.
      [With vat upon vat a meat-borde was held.]
    • 1867, “VERSES IN ANSWER TO THE WEDDEEN O BALLYMORE”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 1, page 100:
      Amang wefty jhemes, 'cha jeist ee-rid apan.
      Among cobwebby scraps, I have just alighted on.
    • 1867, “ABOUT AN OLD SOW GOING TO BE KILLED”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2, page 106:
      Ich aam a vat hog it's drue. Aar is ken apan aam.
      I am a fat hog, 'tis true. There is ken upon them.

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 23