Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French aprisier(apraise, set a price on) (French apprécier), from Late Latin appretiare, from ad- + pretium(price, value) (English precious), from which also appreciate.

VerbEdit

appraise ‎(third-person singular simple present appraises, present participle appraising, simple past and past participle appraised)

  1. (transitive) To set a value or worth of something, particularly by people appointed for the purpose
    to appraise goods and chattels
  2. (transitive) To consider comprehensively
  3. (transitive) To judge the performance of someone, especially a worker
    At the end of the contract, you will be appraised by your line manager.
  4. To estimate; to conjecture.
  5. To praise; to commend.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

Form of apprise in use since 1706 but considered incorrect by some.

VerbEdit

appraise ‎(third-person singular simple present appraises, present participle appraising, simple past and past participle appraised)

  1. (proscribed) To apprise, inform.