See also: conjecturé

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin coniectūra(a guess), from coniectus, perfect passive participle of cōniciō(throw or cast together; guess), from con-(together) + iaciō(throw, hurl); see jet. Compare adjective, eject, inject, project, reject, subject, object, trajectory.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kənˈd͡ʒɛk.t͡ʃə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /kənˈd͡ʒɛk.t͡ʃɚ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

conjecture ‎(countable and uncountable, plural conjectures)

  1. (formal) A statement or an idea which is unproven, but is thought to be true; a guess.
    I explained it, but it is pure conjecture whether he understood, or not.
  2. (formal) A supposition based upon incomplete evidence; a hypothesis.
    The physicist used his conjecture about subatomic particles to design an experiment.
  3. (mathematics, philology) A statement likely to be true based on available evidence, but which has not been formally proven.
  4. (obsolete) Interpretation of signs and omens.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

conjecture ‎(third-person singular simple present conjectures, present participle conjecturing, simple past and past participle conjectured)

  1. (formal, intransitive) To guess; to venture an unproven idea.
    I do not know if it is true; I am simply conjecturing here.
    • South
      Human reason can then, at the best, but conjecture what will be.

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

conjectūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of conjectūrus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

conjecture

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of conjecturar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of conjecturar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of conjecturar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of conjecturar