See also: aspiré

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English aspiren, from Old French aspirer, from Latin aspirare (breathe on; approach; desire).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈspaɪə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /əˈspaɪɚ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: as‧pire

VerbEdit

aspire (third-person singular simple present aspires, present participle aspiring, simple past and past participle aspired)

  1. (intransitive) To have a strong desire or ambition to achieve something.
    to aspire to / for / after / to do something; to aspire that something happens
    He aspires to become a successful doctor.
    We aspire that the world will be a better place.
    Synonyms: crave, pursue, strive, yearn, dream
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To go as high as, to reach the top of (something).
    Synonyms: ascend, mount
  3. (intransitive, archaic, literary) To move upward; to be very tall.
    Synonyms: ascend, rise, soar, tower
    • 1589–1592 (date written), Ch[ristopher] Marl[owe], The Tragicall History of D. Faustus. [], London: [] V[alentine] S[immes] for Thomas Bushell, published 1604, OCLC 863467733; republished as Hermann Breymann, editor, Doctor Faustus (Englische Sprach- und Literaturdenkmale des 16., 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts; 5; Marlowes Werke: Historisch-kritische Ausgabe []; II), Heilbronn, Baden-Württemberg: Verlag von Gebr[üder] Henninger, 1889, OCLC 1020475087, scene VIII:
      In midst of which a sumptuous Temple stands, / That threats the starres with her aspiring toppe.
    • 1794, Ann Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho, London: G.G. and J. Robinson, Volume 1, Chapter 4, p. 116,[4]
      As they descended, they saw [] one of the grand passes of the Pyreneáes into Spain, gleaming with its battlements and towers to the splendour of the setting rays, yellow tops of woods colouring the steeps below, while far above aspired the snowy points of the mountains, still reflecting a rosy hue.
    • 1844, Edgar Allan Poe, “Dream-Land” in Graham’s Magazine, Volume 25, No. 6, June, 1844, p. 256,[5]
      Seas that restlessly aspire, / Surging, unto skies of fire;
    • 1979, Cormac McCarthy, Suttree, New York: Vintage, 1992, p. 4,[6]
      There is a moonshaped rictus in the streetlamp’s globe where a stone has gone and from this aperture there drifts down through the constant helix of aspiring insects a faint and steady rain of the same forms burnt and lifeless.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

aspire

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of aspirar

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

aspire

  1. inflection of aspirer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

aspire

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of aspirar

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

aspire

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of aspirar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of aspirar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of aspirar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of aspirar

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

aspire

  1. third-person singular/plural present subjunctive of aspira

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

aspire

  1. inflection of aspirar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative