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EnglishEdit

 
A hawk soars.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English soren, from Old French essorer (to fly up, soar), from Vulgar Latin *exaurare (to rise into the air), from Latin ex (out) + aura (the air, a breeze), from Ancient Greek αὔρα (aúra, breath). Compare aura, and exhale.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

soar (third-person singular simple present soars, present participle soaring, simple past and past participle soared)

  1. To fly aloft with little effort, as a bird.
    • Byron
      When soars Gaul's vulture with his wings unfurled.
  2. To mount upward on wings, or as on wings.
  3. To remain aloft by means of a glider or other unpowered aircraft.
  4. To rise, especially rapidly or unusually high.
    The pump prices soared into new heights as the strike continued.
  5. (figuratively) To rise in thought, spirits, or imagination; to be exalted in mood.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

soar (plural soars)

  1. The act of soaring.
  2. An upward flight.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese sõar, from Latin sonāre, present active infinitive of sonō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

soar (first-person singular present soo, first-person singular preterite soei, past participle soado)

  1. to sound, to ring
    • 1370, R. Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 400:
      tãger boziñas et ssoar tronpas et anafíjs
      to play conchs and to sound horns and bugles
  2. to be heard
    • 1295, R. Lorenzo (ed.), La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla. Ourense: I.E.O.P.F., page 646:
      Et começoullj a dizer que tã grande era a numeada que del oya et o prez d'ar(ar)mas et os bõos feytos que soarã delle en terra d'Outra mar
      And he began to tell him how great was the reputation that he heard, and of the feats of war and the good deeds that were heard about him in Outremer
  3. to ring a bell
    −Coñécelo? −Non me soa.
    −Do you know him? −No, he doesn't ring a bell. (Lit. "He doesn't sound (to me)"

NounEdit

soar m (plural soares)

  1. sound
    • 1370, R. Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 605:
      Et alí oyriades a uolta et os braados tã grandes, et o rreuoluer et o bolir tã grande, et o soar dos cornos et dos anafíjs, que esto era hũa grã marauilla.
      And being there you would hear the racket and the very high voices, and the uproar and restlessness, and the sound of the horns and of the bugles, and all of this was a great wonder
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Attested since the 13th century. From proto-Galician *solar, from Latin solum. Compare Spanish solar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soar m (plural soares)

  1. building land, plot, site
    • 1290, M. Lucas Álvarez & P. Lucas Domínguez (eds.), El monasterio de San Clodio do Ribeiro en la Edad Media: estudio y documentos. Sada / A Coruña: Edicións do Castro, page 415:
      Et damos a uos vn soar en que façades huna casa logo
      And we give you a plot for you to build a house promptly
    Synonyms: formal, terreo
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • soar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • soar” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • soar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • soar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • soar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

soar m (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. smell

VerbEdit

soar (verbal noun soaral or soarey or soaraghey)

  1. to smell

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
soar hoar
after "yn", toar
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese sõar, from Latin sonāre, present active infinitive of sonō, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *swenh₂- (to sound, resound).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

soar (first-person singular present indicative soo, past participle soado)

  1. make a sound
    • 1913, Fernando Pessoa, “Ó sino da minha aldeia”:
      Ó sino da minha aldeia, / Dolente na tarde calma, / Cada tua badalada / Soa dentro da minha alma.
      Oh bell of my village, / Lazy in this peaceful afternoon, / Each one of your tollings / Resounds in my soul.
    Isso não soa bem.That doesn't sound good.

ConjugationEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French soir (evening).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

soar (nominative plural soars)

  1. evening

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit