at sixes and sevens



Unknown, though it may have originated from the game of hazard and the Old French cinc ‎(five) and sis ‎(six), the riskiest numbers to shoot for, which were misheard and folk-etymologized into English as "six" and "seven".

Prepositional phraseEdit

at sixes and sevens

  1. (idiomatic) In a state of confusion.
    • 1912, Arthur Quiller-Couch, Poison Island, ch. 23:
      Oh, what a racket! And everything on deck apparently at sixes and sevens. Mail-bags and passengers mixed up in every direction.
  2. (idiomatic, of people or groups) In a state of dispute or disagreement.
    • 1911, Jack London, Adventure, ch. 6:
      Her outlook on life was so different from what he conceived a woman's outlook should be, that he was more often than not at sixes and sevens with her.
    • 1976, Tim Rice, "Don't Cry For Me Argentina":
      All you will see is a girl you once knew, although she's dressed up to the nines, at sixes and sevens with you.




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