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See also: Sein and séin

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

sein (plural seins)

  1. Archaic spelling of seine.

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

EtymologyEdit

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PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

sein

  1. child

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French seigne, a northern variant of signe, from Latin signum.[1] The word zegen derives from the same source.

NounEdit

sein n (plural seinen, diminutive seintje n)

  1. signal

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ sein; in J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

VerbEdit

sein

  1. first-person singular present indicative of seinen
  2. imperative of seinen

EstonianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

EtymologyEdit

An old Baltic loanword, compare siena. Finnish seinä is of the same origin.

NounEdit

sein (genitive seina, partitive seina)

  1. wall

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: sein
  • Rhymes: -ein
  • IPA(key): /ˈsei̯n/

NounEdit

sein

  1. Genitive singular form of sei.
  2. Instructive plural form of sei.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Latin sinus. Doublet of sinus. Compare Italian seno, Romanian sân, Romansch sain, Portuguese seio, Spanish seno.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sein m (plural seins)

  1. (anatomy) breast
    sur votre jeune sein laissez rouler ma tête - let my head roll on your young breast
  2. (literary) womb
    elle a porté cet enfant dans son sein - she carried this child in her womb
  3. bosom
    au sein de la famille - in the bosom of the family
    le sein du Père - the bosom of the Father

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

 
German Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia de

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /zaɪ̯n/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪ̯n
  • Homophone: seinen (according to a common pronunciation of this form)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German sein, sīn, from Old High German sīn (to be) (with some parts from Proto-Germanic *wesaną (to be) and *beuną (to be, exist, become)), from Proto-Indo-European *es-, *h₁es- (to be, exist). Cognate with Dutch zijn (to be), Low German ween, sien, Old English sēon (to be). More at sooth.

VerbEdit

sein (irregular, third-person singular simple present ist, past tense war, past participle gewesen, past subjunctive wäre, auxiliary sein)

  1. (with a predicate adjective or predicate nominative) to be
    Das ist schön.
    That is beautiful.
    Das ist ein Auto.
    That is a car.
  2. (with a predicate adjective and an indirect object) to feel (to experience a certain condition)
    Mir ist kalt. Mir ist übel. Mir ist schwindelig. Mir ist wohl.
    I feel cold. I feel sick. I feel dizzy. I feel well. (Literally: To me is cold. etc.)
  3. (auxiliary) forms the present perfect and past perfect tense of certain intransitive verbs
    Er ist alt geworden.
    He has become old.
  4. (intransitive) to exist; there be; to be alive
    Was nicht ist, kann noch werden. (A common proverb)
    That which does not exist now, may come into existence.
    Wenn ich nicht mehr bin, erbst du das Haus.
    When I am no more, you'll inherit the house.
  5. (intransitive, colloquial) to have the next turn (in a game, in a queue, etc.)
    Du bist. — “It’s your turn.”
    Du bist nach mir. — “Your turn is after mine.”
  6. (intransitive, childish) to be "it"; to be the tagger in a game of tag
    Du bist! (Emphasis on du) – You're it!
    Ich bin nicht mehr. – I'm not it anymore.
ConjugationEdit

Alternative forms:

  • Past participle: gewest (obsolete; poetical)
  • Second-person plural preterite indicative: waret (older; poetical)
  • Second-person singular subjunctive II: wärst
  • Second-person plural subjunctive II: wärt

The subjunctive I (first and third person) and indicative (first person only) forms are also used as imperatives.

  • Seien wir mal ehrlich./Sind wir mal ehrlich.Let’s be honest.
  • Seien Sie mal ehrlich.Be (second-person formal) honest!
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle High German sein, sīn, from Old High German sīn, from Proto-Germanic *sīnaz (his, her, its, their), from Proto-Indo-European *seynos, genitive of *só (that). Cognate with Low German sien (his, its), Dutch zijn (his, its), Danish sin (his, her, its, their), Old English sīn (his, its).

DeterminerEdit

sein

  1. his
  2. its (agreeing with a neuter or masculine noun)
  3. one's
    Man muss seinem Herzen folgen.
    One must follow one’s heart.
InflectionEdit
Declension of sein
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative sein seine sein seine
genitive seines seiner seines seiner
dative seinem seiner seinem seinen
accusative seinen seine sein seine


Usage notesEdit

When used as a pronoun, the nominative masculine takes the form seiner, and the nominative/accusative neuter takes the form seines or seins.

  • mein Vater und seinermy father and his
  • mein Kind und sein(e)smy child and his
See alsoEdit

Nominatives of the possessive pronouns:

masculine feminine neuter plural
First-person singular mein meine mein meine
Second-person singular dein deine dein deine
Dein Deine Dein Deine
Third-person singular sein seine sein seine
ihr ihre ihr ihre
First-person plural unser uns(e)re unser uns(e)re
Second-person plural euer eure euer eure
Third-person plural ihr ihre ihr ihre
Second-person formal Ihr Ihre Ihr Ihre


AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

sein

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌴𐌹𐌽

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

sein

  1. Alternative form of seien

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse seinn

AdjectiveEdit

sein (neuter singular seint, definite singular and plural seine, comparative seinere, indefinite superlative seinest, definite superlative seineste)

  1. alternative form of sen

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse seinn.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sein (masculine and feminine sein, neuter seint, definite singular and plural seine, comparative seinare, indefinite superlative seinast, definite superlative seinaste)

  1. slow
  2. late (arriving after expected time)
  3. late (near the end of a period of time)

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

sein m (oblique plural seinz, nominative singular seinz, nominative plural sein)

  1. breast (anatomy)

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) sain
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) sagn

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sinus (compare French sein, Italian seno, Romanian sân, Spanish seno).

NounEdit

sein m

  1. (Sursilvan, anatomy) breast (of a woman)

Related termsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) pèz
  • (Sutsilvan) péz
  • (Puter, Vallader) pet

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse seinn, from Proto-Germanic *sainaz, *sainijaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sein

  1. well late; arriving late; sluggish, tardy

Derived termsEdit