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A throw of two dice, such as might occur in the game of hazard as a main of 9

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hasard, from Old French hasart (a game of dice) (noun), hasarder (verb), probably from Arabic اَلزَّهْر(az-zahr, the dice). Compare Spanish azar, Portuguese azar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hazard (countable and uncountable, plural hazards)

  1. (historical) A game of chance played with dice, usually for monetary stakes; popular mainly from 14th c. to 19th c.
    • 2002, Jo Beverley, Hazard, →ISBN:
      Anne found the gaming room where mostly older people were seated at card tables. She realized then that, of course, no one was playing hazard. Dice games were technically illegal, and certainly improper. Gambling was illegal, but no one paid attention to that. Most people were playing whist for penny points.
  2. Chance. [from 16th c.]
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Richard III, act 5, scene 4:
      I will stand the hazard of the die.
    • 2006 May 20, John Patterson, The Guardian:
      I see animated movies are now managing, by hazard or design, to reflect our contemporary reality more accurately than live-action movies.
  3. The chance of suffering harm; danger, peril, risk of loss. [from 16th c.]
    He encountered the enemy at the hazard of his reputation and life.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Rogers
      Men are led on from one stage of life to another in a condition of the utmost hazard.
    • 1599, Wm. Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar:
      Why, now, blow wind, swell billow, and swim bark! The storm is up and all is on the hazard.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      He then launched forth into a panegyric on Allworthy's goodness; into the highest encomiums on his friendship; and concluded by saying, he should never forgive his brother for having put the place which he bore in that friendship to a hazard.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 1, in Internal Combustion[1]:
      If successful, Edison and Ford—in 1914—would move society away from the ever more expensive and then universally known killing hazards of gasoline cars:  [] .
    • 2009 December 27, Barbara Ellen, The Guardian:
      Quite apart from the gruesome road hazards, snow is awful even when you don't have to travel.
  4. An obstacle or other feature which causes risk or danger; originally in sports, and now applied more generally. [from 19th c.]
    The video game involves guiding a character on a skateboard past all kinds of hazards.
  5. (in driving a vehicle) An obstacle or other feature that presents a risk or danger that justifies the driver in taking action to avoid it.
  6. (golf) A sand or water obstacle on a golf course.
  7. (billiards) The act of potting a ball, whether the object ball (winning hazard) or the player's ball (losing hazard).
  8. (obsolete) Anything that is hazarded or risked, such as a stake in gambling.
    • c.1600?, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice
      But if you please
      To shoot another arrow that self way
      Which you did shoot the first, I do not doubt,
      As I will watch the aim, or to find both
      Or bring your latter hazard back again
      And thankfully rest debtor for the first.
  9. (tennis) The side of the court into which the ball is served.
  10. (programming) A problem with the instruction pipeline in CPU microarchitectures when the next instruction cannot execute in the following clock cycle, potentially leading to incorrect results.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hazard (third-person singular simple present hazards, present participle hazarding, simple past and past participle hazarded)

  1. To expose to chance; to take a risk.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Clarke
      Men hazard nothing by a course of evangelical obedience.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Fuller
      He hazards his neck to the halter.
  2. To risk (something); to venture, to incur, or bring on.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      I hazarded the loss of whom I loved.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Landor
      They hazard to cut their feet.
    I'll hazard a guess.

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Hasard, from Old French hasart.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hazard m

  1. gambling
  2. risk, gamble

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "hazard" in Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, electronic version, Leda, 2007

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

hazard m (plural hazards)

  1. Archaic spelling of hasard, chiefly used before 1800

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

hazard m (invariable)

  1. hazard lights (on a vehicle)

Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

hazard m (plural hazards)

  1. hazard; obstacle

DescendantsEdit

  • French: hasard

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hazard m inan

  1. (singular only) gambling
  2. (electronics) race condition

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /xǎzard/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧zard

NounEdit

hàzard m (Cyrillic spelling ха̀зард)

  1. gamble, gambling
  2. risk, hazard

DeclensionEdit