Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French baies, feminine plural of adjective bai ‎(bay-colored) mistaken as a singular noun.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baize ‎(plural baizes)

  1. A thick, soft, usually woolen cloth resembling felt; often colored green and used for coverings on card tables, billiard and snooker tables, etc.
  2. (dated) A coarse woolen stuff with a long nap; -- usually dyed in plain colors.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe:
      my goods being all English manufacture, such as cloths, stuffs, baize, and things particularly valuable and desirable in the country, I found means to sell them to a very great advantage...
    • 1885, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde:
      At the further end, a flight of stairs mounted to a door covered with a red baize; and through this, Mr. Utterson was at last received into the doctor's cabinet.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

baize ‎(third-person singular simple present baizes, present participle baizing, simple past and past participle baized)

  1. To cover or line with baize.
Read in another language