See also: Felt, FELT, and félt

English edit

 
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Felt cloths.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /fɛlt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English felt, from Old English felt, from Proto-West Germanic *felt (compare Dutch vilt, German Filz, Danish filt, French feutre), from Proto-Indo-European *pilto, *pilso 'felt' (compare Latin pilleus (felt, adjective), Old Church Slavonic плъсть (plŭstĭ), Albanian plis, Ancient Greek πῖλος (pîlos)), from *pel- 'to beat'. More at anvil.

Noun edit

 
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felt (countable and uncountable, plural felts)

  1. A cloth or stuff made of matted fibres of wool, or wool and fur, fulled or wrought into a compact substance by rolling and pressure, with lees or size, without spinning or weaving.
  2. A hat made of felt.
  3. A felt-tip pen.
    • 1989, Anne D. Forester, Margaret Reinhard, The Learners' Way, page 116:
      You'll notice that all the illustrations are done in different media: some with pencil crayons, some with felts, some with paint, some with chalk pastels.
  4. (obsolete) A skin or hide; a fell; a pelt.
    • 1707, John Mortimer, The whole art of husbandry:
      To know whether sheep are sound or not, see that the felt be loose.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

felt (third-person singular simple present felts, present participle felting, simple past and past participle felted)

  1. (transitive) To make into felt, or a feltlike substance; to cause to adhere and mat together.
    • a. 1677 (date written), Matthew Hale, The Primitive Origination of Mankind, Considered and Examined According to the Light of Nature, London: [] William Godbid, for William Shrowsbery, [], published 1677, →OCLC:
      the same Wool , for instance , one Men felts it into a Hat, another weaves it into Cloth , another weaves it into Kersey or Serge
  2. (transitive) To cover with, or as if with, felt.
    to felt the cylinder of a steam engine
  3. (transitive, poker) To cause a player to lose all their chips.
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2 edit

Old English fēled, corresponding to feel +‎ -ed.

Verb edit

felt

  1. simple past and past participle of feel

Adjective edit

felt (comparative more felt, superlative most felt)

  1. That has been experienced or perceived.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin, published 2010, page 257:
      Conversions to Islam can therefore be a deeply felt aesthetic experience that rarely occurs in Christian accounts of conversion, which are generally the source rather than the result of a Christian experience of beauty.
Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Low German velt, from Old Saxon feld, from Proto-West Germanic *felþu.

Gender changed by influence from mark.

Noun edit

felt c (singular definite felten, not used in plural form)

  1. field (the practical part of something)
  2. (e.g., sciences, military) field; an outlying area, as opposed to e.g. the lab, office or barracks
    • 2017, Palle Lauring, Svenskekrige og enevoldsmagt, Gyldendal A/S, →ISBN:
      Han oplevede hele Tredveårskrigen i felten, fra først til sidst.
      He experienced all of the thirty-years war in the field, from the beginning to the end.
    • 1913, Anno 13 [i.e. tretten]: Tysklands rejsning mod Napoleon for 100 år siden:
      Han var rykket i Felten som Kaptain og Kompagnifører, men var dog nu blevet forfremmet til Major, ...
      He had deployed as a captain and a company-leader, but had now been promoted to major, ...
    • 1986, Johannes Møllehave, Vor tids tid: nutidige og utidige tids- og tankespring:
      Efter anden verdenskrig skrev Theodor W. Adorno: »Bemærkede man da ikke ved krigsslutningen, at folk kom stumme tilbage fra felten?
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 2012, Daniel Silva, Portræt af en spion: En Gabriel Allon-roman, Rosinante & Co, →ISBN:
      Han overvågede Sovjetunionens sammenbrud, ikke ude fra felten, men fra et komfortabelt kontor i Langley, ...
      He surveyed the collapse of the Soviet Union, not from the field, but from a comfortable office in Langley, ...
    • 1918, Georg Friedrich Nicolai, Krigens Biologi:
      ... Officerer og Mandskab, som vendte hjem fra Felten, ...
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1986, Grønland: årsberetning:
      I felten blev der ikke observeret nogen torske larver i prøverne, ...
      In the field, no cod larvae were observed in the samples, ...
    • 1993, Danmarks geologiske undersøgelse, Årsberetning for ... ; Arbejdsprogram ...:
      En af instituttets vigtigste opgaver i forbindelse med geologiske undersøgelser er dataindsamling i felten.
      One of the institute's most important tasks relating to the geological surveys is data collection in the field.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From German Feld, from Old High German feld, from Proto-West Germanic *felþu.

Noun edit

felt n (singular definite feltet, plural indefinite felter)

  1. field
  2. sphere, province
  3. square
Inflection edit
Derived terms edit

References edit

Middle English edit

 
felt

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English felt, from Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

felt (plural feltes)

  1. Felted fabric or a sample or swab of it; felt.
  2. A piece of headgear made from felted fabric; a felt hat.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • English: felt
  • Scots: felt

References edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology 1 edit

From German Feld.

Noun edit

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt or felter, definite plural felta or feltene)

  1. field
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Low German velt.

Noun edit

felt m (definite singular felten, uncountable)

  1. field (in the military sense)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

felt

  1. past participle of felle

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

From German Feld.

Noun edit

felt n (definite singular feltet, indefinite plural felt, definite plural felta)

  1. field
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Low German velt.

Noun edit

felt m (definite singular felten, uncountable)

  1. field (in the military sense)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

felt

  1. past participle of fella

References edit

Old Dutch edit

Noun edit

felt

  1. Accusative singular form of feld
  2. Nominative plural form of feld

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *felt.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

felt m

  1. felt

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Yola edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English felde, from Old English fylde.

Verb edit

felt

  1. simple past tense of vill

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 40