See also: bastión and Bastion

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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A bastion (1)

Etymology

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First attested in 1562. From French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bastion (plural bastions)

  1. (architecture) A projecting part of a rampart or other fortification.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, “Beginnings”, in The Book of Small:
      [] Fort Camosun had swelled herself from being a little Hudson's Bay Fort, inside a stockade with bastions at the corners, into being the little town of Victoria, and the capital of British Columbia.
  2. A well-fortified position; a stronghold or citadel.
  3. (figuratively) A person, group, or thing, that strongly defends some principle.
    a bastion of hope
    the bastion of democracy
  4. Any large prominence; something that resembles a bastion in size and form.
    • 1850, [Alfred, Lord Tennyson], In Memoriam, London: Edward Moxon, [], →OCLC, Canto XV, page 24:
      […] yonder cloud
      That rises upward always higher,
      ⁠And onward drags a labouring breast,
      ⁠And topples round the dreary west,
      A looming bastion fringed with fire.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, 1st Australian edition, Sydney, N.S.W.: Ure Smith, published 1962, →OCLC, page 32:
      It spread slowly up from the sea-rim, a welling upwards of pure white light, ghosting the beach with silver and drawing the grey bastions of sandstone out of formless space.

Derived terms

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Translations

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Verb

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bastion (third-person singular simple present bastions, present participle bastioning, simple past and past participle bastioned)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with a bastion.

Anagrams

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Dutch

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle French bastion.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˌbɑs.tiˈɔn/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: bas‧ti‧on
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

Noun

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bastion n (plural bastions, diminutive bastionnetje n)

  1. bastion; a projecting part of a rampart
    Synonym: bolwerk

Estonian

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Etymology

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From German Bastion.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈb̥ɑsʲtio̯n/, [ˈb̥ɑsʲtʲio̯n]
  • Rhymes: -ɑsʲtion
  • Hyphenation: bas‧tion

Noun

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bastion (genitive bastioni, partitive bastioni or bastionit)

  1. bastion (originally a semi-circular, later polygonal defensive building that protrudes from the main rampart of the fortress)

Declension

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Declension of bastion (ÕS type 2/õpik, no gradation)
singular plural
nominative bastion bastionid
accusative nom.
gen. bastioni
genitive bastionite
partitive bastionit bastioneid
illative bastionisse bastionitesse
bastioneisse
inessive bastionis bastionites
bastioneis
elative bastionist bastionitest
bastioneist
allative bastionile bastionitele
bastioneile
adessive bastionil bastionitel
bastioneil
ablative bastionilt bastionitelt
bastioneilt
translative bastioniks bastioniteks
bastioneiks
terminative bastionini bastioniteni
essive bastionina bastionitena
abessive bastionita bastioniteta
comitative bastioniga bastionitega
Declension of bastion (ÕS type 19/seminar, no gradation)
singular plural
nominative bastion bastionid
accusative nom.
gen. bastioni
genitive bastionide
partitive bastioni bastione
bastionisid
illative bastioni
bastionisse
bastionidesse
bastionesse
inessive bastionis bastionides
bastiones
elative bastionist bastionidest
bastionest
allative bastionile bastionidele
bastionele
adessive bastionil bastionidel
bastionel
ablative bastionilt bastionidelt
bastionelt
translative bastioniks bastionideks
bastioneks
terminative bastionini bastionideni
essive bastionina bastionidena
abessive bastionita bastionideta
comitative bastioniga bastionidega

References

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  • bastion in Sõnaveeb (Eesti Keele Instituut)
  • bastion”, in [EKSS] Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat [Descriptive Dictionary of the Estonian Language] (in Estonian) (online version), Tallinn: Eesti Keele Sihtasutus (Estonian Language Foundation), 2009

French

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French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology

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Inherited from Middle French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress) or Italian bastione. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term. .

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bastion m (plural bastions)

  1. bastion
  2. stronghold

Descendants

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Further reading

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Anagrams

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology

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From Italian bastione, via French bastion.

Noun

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bastion m (definite singular bastionen, indefinite plural bastioner, definite plural bastionene)

  1. a bastion (part of a fortification; also figurative)

References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology

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From Italian bastione, via French bastion.

Noun

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bastion m (definite singular bastionen, indefinite plural bastionar, definite plural bastionane)

  1. a bastion (part of a fortification; also figurative)

References

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Borrowed from French bastion, from Old French bastille.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bastion m inan (diminutive bastionik)

  1. (military) bastion, stronghold (place built to withstand attack)
  2. (figuratively) bastion, stronghold (place of domination by, or refuge or survival of, a particular group or idea)
    Synonym: szaniec
  3. (figuratively) bastion (person, group, or thing, that strongly defends some principle)

Declension

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Derived terms

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adjective

Further reading

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  • bastion in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bastion in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French bastion.

Noun

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bastion n (plural bastioane)

  1. stronghold

Declension

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Swedish

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Noun

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bastion c

  1. bastion; a projecting part of a rampart

Declension

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Declension of bastion 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bastion bastionen bastioner bastionerna
Genitive bastions bastionens bastioners bastionernas