bastion

See also: bastión and Bastion

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
A bastion (1)
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

First attested in 1562. From French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bastion (plural bastions)

  1. (architecture) A projecting part of a rampart or other fortification.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, The Book of Small, "Beginnings," [1]
      [] Fort Camosun had swelled herself from being a little Hudson's Bay Fort, inside a stockade with bastions at the corners, into being the little town of Victoria, and the capital of British Columbia.
  2. A well-fortified position; a stronghold or citadel.
  3. (figuratively) A person, group, or thing, that strongly defends some principle.
    a bastion of hope
    the bastion of democracy

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bastion (third-person singular simple present bastions, present participle bastioning, simple past and past participle bastioned)

  1. (transitive) To furnish with a bastion.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French bastion.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌbɑs.tiˈɔn/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: bas‧ti‧on
  • Rhymes: -ɔn

NounEdit

bastion n (plural bastions, diminutive bastionnetje n)

  1. bastion; a projecting part of a rampart
    Synonym: bolwerk

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress) or Italian bastione. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bastion m (plural bastions)

  1. bastion
  2. stronghold

DescendantsEdit

  • Polish: bastion

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Italian bastione, via French bastion

NounEdit

bastion m (definite singular bastionen, indefinite plural bastioner, definite plural bastionene)

  1. a bastion (part of a fortification; also figurative)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian bastione, via French bastion

NounEdit

bastion m (definite singular bastionen, indefinite plural bastionar, definite plural bastionane)

  1. a bastion (part of a fortification; also figurative)

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From French bastion, from Old French bastille (fortress).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bastion m inan (diminutive bastionik)

  1. (architecture) bastion, stronghold (place built to withstand attack)
  2. (figuratively) stronghold (place of domination by, or refuge or survival of, a particular group or idea)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bastion in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bastion in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bastion

NounEdit

bastion n (plural bastioane)

  1. stronghold

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

bastion c

  1. bastion; a projecting part of a rampart

DeclensionEdit

Declension of bastion 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bastion bastionen bastioner bastionerna
Genitive bastions bastionens bastioners bastionernas