bastille

See also: Bastille

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French bastille, from Late Latin bastilia, plural of bastile, from bastire (to build).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): [bæˈstɪəɫ], [bæˈstiːɫ]
  • (file)

NounEdit

bastille (plural bastilles)

  1. A prison or jail.
    • 1663, Samuel Butler, Hudibras, I.2:
      Thither arriv'd, th' advent'rous Knight / And bold Squire from their Steeds alight, / At th' outward Wall, near which there stands / A Bastile, built t' imprison Hands [...].
  2. Confusion of bastille with bastion (bulwark).

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bastille (third-person singular simple present bastilles, present participle bastilling, simple past and past participle bastilled)

  1. To confine as though in a bastille; to imprison.
    • 1796–7, Mary Wollstonecraft, The Wrongs of Woman, Oxford 2009, p. 137:
      Marriage had bastilled me for life.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin bastilia, plural of bastile, from Medieval Latin bastīre (to build, sew).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bastille f (plural bastilles)

  1. fortress

Further readingEdit