See also: Boomer

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

boom +‎ -er

NounEdit

boomer (plural boomers)

  1. An adult male kangaroo.
  2. Something that makes a booming sound.
    • 2010, Pearl Cleage, Till You Hear from Me (page 151)
      That's when the Rev let loose one of those great big boomers of a laugh. It was so loud in the closed space, the effect was what Wes imagined it felt like to hear a bullet fired in a car.
  3. (US, mainly 1920–1930) A transient worker who would move from boom town to boom town in search of temporary work.
  4. A device used to bind or tighten chain.
    Synonym: chain binder
  5. (US, nautical, military, slang) A nuclear ballistic missile submarine, SSBN.
    • 1990, The Hunt For Red October:
      Distant contact, probably submerged. It's a wild guess, but I'd say we hit a boomer coming out of the barn. Could be a missile boat out of Polijarny.
  6. (Britain) A bittern (subfamily Botaurinae).
  7. (Appalachia) A red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus).
  8. A mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa).
    Synonyms: sewellel beaver, sewellel

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of baby boomer

NounEdit

boomer (plural boomers)

  1. (informal) a baby boomer.
    Coordinate term: zoomer
    Boomers came of age in the era of The Beatles and Led Zeppelin.
    • 2007, Leonard Steinhorn, The Greater Generation: In Defense of the Baby Boom Legacy, Macmillan (→ISBN)
      To the many Boomers who sensed that something had gone awry in Greatest Generation America, Mad was a glimmer of truth, a benign but trenchant voice against hypocrisy and pretense, a way to laugh at parents who fretted over status symbols and authorities who talked one way but acted another.
    • 2014, Melvin Delgado, Baby Boomers of Color: Implications for Social Work Policy and Practice, Columbia University Press (→ISBN), page 4:
      These fears have been exacerbated by the recession, which forced many boomers to turn to Social Security earlier than anticipated because of long-term unemployment and financial crises (Johnson and Wilson, 2010a, b).
  2. (slang, sometimes derogatory, by extension) An elderly person.
    I'm going to be a boomer by the time this thing is over.
  3. (slang, sometimes derogatory, by extension) A person who does not know how to utilize new technologies well.
    I'm such a boomer; I have no idea how to use this phone.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Timeline of generations
Generation AlphazoomerGeneration ZmillennialGeneration YMTV generationGeneration Xbaby boomerSilent Generation

ReferencesEdit

  • boomer at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed English boomer, a clipping of baby boomer. Equivalent to boom +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbuː.mər/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: boo‧mer

NounEdit

boomer m (plural boomers)

  1. (informal) A baby boomer, stereotypically associated with selfish or old-fashioned ideas. [from ca. 2000]

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed English boomer, a clipping of baby boomer; mainly through the expression OK, boomer. Equivalent to boom +‎ -eur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

boomer m (plural boomers, feminine boomeuse)

  1. (Internet slang) A baby boomer, an old person stereotypically portrayed as ignorant of new technology or modern concepts.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English boomer.

NounEdit

boomer m (invariable)

  1. boomer

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From English boomer.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): //ˈbu.mɛr// invalid IPA characters (//)

NounEdit

boomer m pers

  1. (derogatory, Internet slang) boomer (person who does not know how to utilize new technologies well)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • boomer in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • boomer in Polish dictionaries at PWN