See also: Strand and štrand

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

strand (plural strands)

  1. The shore or beach of the sea or ocean.
    Grand Strand
  2. (poetic, archaic or regional) The shore or beach of a lake or river.
  3. A small brook or rivulet.
  4. (Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A passage for water; gutter.
  5. A street.
Alternative forms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

strand (third-person singular simple present strands, present participle stranding, simple past and past participle stranded)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To run aground; to beach.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To leave (someone) in a difficult situation; to abandon or desert.
  3. (transitive, baseball) To cause the third out of an inning to be made, leaving a runner on base.
    Jones pops up; that's going to strand a pair.
Synonyms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Origin uncertain. Cognate with Scots stran, strawn, strand (strand). Perhaps the same as strand ("rivulet, stream, gutter"; see Etymology 1 above); or from Middle English *stran, from Old French estran (a rope, cord), from Middle High German stren, strene (skein, strand), from Old High German streno, from Proto-West Germanic *strenō, from Proto-Germanic *strinô (strip, strand), from Proto-Indo-European *strēy-, *ster- (strip, line, streak, ray, stripe, row); related to Dutch streen (skein, hank of thread, strand, string), German Strähne (skein, hank of thread, strand of hair). Compare also Old High German stranga (strand of hair), modern German Strang (strand, thread, cord).

Noun edit

strand (plural strands)

  1. Each of the strings which, twisted together, make up a yarn, rope or cord.
  2. A string.
  3. An individual length of any fine, string-like substance.
    strand of spaghetti
    strand of hair
  4. (electronics) A group of wires, usually twisted or braided.
  5. (broadcasting) A series of programmes on a particular theme or linked subject.
    • 2020, Nichola Dobson, Historical Dictionary of Animation and Cartoons, page 45:
      By 1985, the children's strand had been renamed Children's BBC (CBBC by the mid-1990s), which continued to show animation among other programming in a dedicated time slot.
  6. (figurative) An element in a composite whole; a sequence of linked events or facts; a logical thread.
    strand of truth
    • 2004, David Wray, Literacy: Major Themes in Education, Taylor & Francis, →ISBN, page 78:
      She responds to both questions in writing and checks her answer on the fact question. Her suspicions confirmed about the importance of the two names, Miranda vows to pay close attention to this strand of the story as she continues to read.
  7. (genetics) A nucleotide chain.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Note: many languages have particular words for “a strand of <substance>” that are different for each substance. The translations below refer to strands in general. You might find a more appropriate translation under the word for the substance itself.

Verb edit

strand (third-person singular simple present strands, present participle stranding, simple past and past participle stranded)

  1. (transitive) To break a strand of (a rope).
  2. (transitive) To form by uniting strands.
Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch strand, from Middle Dutch strant.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

strand (plural strande, diminutive strandjie)

  1. beach

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse strǫnd.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /stran/, [sd̥ʁɑnˀ]

Noun edit

strand c (singular definite stranden, plural indefinite strande)

  1. beach
  2. shore, seashore
  3. seaside

Inflection edit

Derived terms edit

Verb edit

strand

  1. imperative of strande

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Dutch strant. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun edit

strand n (plural stranden, diminutive strandje n)

  1. beach, strand
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Afrikaans: strand

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

strand

  1. inflection of stranden:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

From German Strand.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

strand (plural strandok)

  1. beach (a sandy shore of a body of water used for summertime leisure, swimming, suntanning)
  2. pool, swimming pool (an urban open-air facility with lawns, trees and several artificially constructed pools, used for summertime leisure)

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative strand strandok
accusative strandot strandokat
dative strandnak strandoknak
instrumental stranddal strandokkal
causal-final strandért strandokért
translative stranddá strandokká
terminative strandig strandokig
essive-formal strandként strandokként
essive-modal
inessive strandban strandokban
superessive strandon strandokon
adessive strandnál strandoknál
illative strandba strandokba
sublative strandra strandokra
allative strandhoz strandokhoz
elative strandból strandokból
delative strandról strandokról
ablative strandtól strandoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
strandé strandoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
strandéi strandokéi
Possessive forms of strand
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. strandom strandjaim
2nd person sing. strandod strandjaid
3rd person sing. strandja strandjai
1st person plural strandunk strandjaink
2nd person plural strandotok strandjaitok
3rd person plural strandjuk strandjaik

Derived terms edit

(Compound words):

References edit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Further reading edit

  • strand in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From stranda (to run aground).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

strand n (genitive singular strands, nominative plural strönd)

  1. running aground, stranding

Declension edit

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English strand, from Proto-Germanic *strandō.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /strand/, /strɔːnd/

Noun edit

strand (plural strandes)

  1. (chiefly Northern) beach, shoreline

Descendants edit

References edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse strǫnd.

Noun edit

strand f or m (definite singular stranda or stranden, indefinite plural strender, definite plural strendene)

  1. a beach or shore
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

strand

  1. imperative of strande

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From Old Norse strǫnd. Akin to English strand.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /strɑnd/, /strɑnː/

Noun edit

strand f (definite singular stranda, indefinite plural strender, definite plural strendene)

  1. a beach or shore

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Old English edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *strandō.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

strand n

  1. beach
  2. shore

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish strand, from Old Norse strǫnd, from Proto-Germanic *strandō, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)trAnt-.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

strand c

  1. beach (not necessarily sandy)
  2. shore

Usage notes edit

More strongly associated with beaches compared to English shore, but works as a general word for shore when context is provided. Swedish often prefers phrases with land (land) instead, for example "Vi seglade mot land" (We sailed toward the shore) and "in mot land" (into shore – "in toward land"). See also for example i land (ashore).

Declension edit

Declension of strand 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative strand stranden stränder stränderna
Genitive strands strandens stränders strändernas

Related terms edit

References edit