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See also: OIr, oír, óir, òir, öir, oïr, -oir, and -óir

Contents

CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (archaic, dialectal) oure

EtymologyEdit

From Latin audīre, present active infinitive of audiō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew-is-d-, a compound of Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewis (clearly, manifestly) (from the root *h₂ew- (to see, perceive)) and *dʰh₁-ye/o- (to render).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

oir (first-person singular present oeixo, past participle oït)

  1. to hear

ConjugationEdit

As reduir.

Archaic forms:[1]

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish oirid (is suited or adapted (to), corresponds (to), is in keeping (with)).

VerbEdit

oir (present analytic oireann, future analytic oirfidh, verbal noun oiriúint, past participle oirthe)

  1. (intransitive) suit, fit, become

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • oir do (wish, need, require)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
oir n-oir hoir not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • "oir" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • oirid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • audir (10th century, attested in the third-person singular and the past participle audit)
  • oïr (diaereses are not universally used in scholarly transcriptions of Old French)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin audīre, present active infinitive of audiō.

VerbEdit

oir

  1. to listen (to)
  2. to hear

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

oir

  1. Alternative form of oyr

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish óre, hóre, from Latin hōra

ConjunctionEdit

oir

  1. since, for, because
    Thog iad teine, oir bha an latha fuar.They made a fire since the day was cold.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish ar.

NounEdit

oir f (genitive singular oire, plural oirean)

  1. edge, verge, fringe, margin, border, brink
    oir na creigethe edge of the cliff
    oir dhìreachstraight edge
    oir phàipeirmargin of a paper
    às oir a shùlafrom the corner of his eye
  2. rim, brim, lip
  3. ledge
    air oir na h-uinneigon the window sill
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • óre, (hóre)” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.