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See also: Kant and känt

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BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *kant, from Proto-Celtic *kantom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

NumeralEdit

kant

  1. (cardinal) hundred
    Kant bro, kant giz, kant perez, kant iliz
    A hundred countries, a hundred guises, a hundred parishes, a hundred churches.

MutationEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

kant c (singular definite kanten, plural indefinite kanter)

  1. edge, border

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -ɑnt
  • IPA(key): /kɑnt/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch cant, from Old Northern French cant.

NounEdit

kant m (plural kanten, diminutive kantje n)

  1. side, face (of an object)
    De deur is aan deze kant van het gebouw.
    The door is on this side of the building.
    Synonym: zijde
  2. side (as opposed to top or bottom)
    De boom is omgevallen en ligt nu op zijn kant.
    The tree has fallen over and is now lying on its side.
    Synonym: zij
  3. way, direction
    We rijden de verkeerde kant op.
    We're driving in the wrong direction.
    Synonym: richting
  4. lace (textile pattern)
    Deze doek is met kant versierd.
    This cloth is decorated with lace.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

kant

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of kanten
  2. imperative of kanten

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

kant

  1. Romanization of 𐌺𐌰𐌽𐍄

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

kan +‎ -t

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈkɒnt]
  • Hyphenation: kant

NounEdit

kant

  1. accusative singular of kan

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin cantus (corner, side), via Middle Low German or German Low German

NounEdit

kant m (definite singular kanten, indefinite plural kanter, definite plural kantene)

  1. edge, border, rim

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin cantus (corner, side), via Italian canto and Old French cant.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kant m (definite singular kanten, indefinite plural kantar, definite plural kantane)

  1. an edge, a border
    Ikkje gå for nær kanten.
    Don't go too near the edge.
  2. an area
    På den kanten av byen er det mykje bråk.
    There is a lot of trouble in that part of town.
  3. a direction
    Vinden kjem oftast frå den kanten.
    The wind most often blows from that direction.

på alle kantar

  1. everywhere, all over

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Low German kant (edge, corner), Pomeranian form of southern Low German kante.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kant m inan

  1. edge
  2. crease in fabric, e.g. on trousers
  3. (colloquial) an instance of cheating in a game

Usage notesEdit

Sense #1 is used for edges which are well defined but dull (cannot cut anything), such as the edge of a table. Compare krawędź, ostrze.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kant c

  1. an edge; border; brim.
  2. (mathematics) a boundary or edge.
    En triangel har tre kanter.
    A triangle has three edges.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of kant 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative kant kanten kanter kanterna
Genitive kants kantens kanters kanternas

SynonymsEdit

  • rand (mathematics)
  • bryn (edge of a forest)

See alsoEdit