See also: Tart, tárt, and tärt

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English tart, from Old English teart (sharp, rough, severe), from Proto-West Germanic *tart, from Proto-Germanic *tartaz (rough, sharp, tearing), from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (to flay, split, cleave). Related to Scots tairt (tart; tartness), Dutch tarten (to defy, challenge, mock), German trotzen (to defy, brave, mock), perhaps Albanian thartë (sour, acid, sharp).

Adjective edit

tart (comparative tarter, superlative tartest)

  1. Sharp to the taste; acid; sour.
    I ate a very tart apple.
  2. (of wine) high or too high in acidity.
  3. (figuratively) Sharp; keen; severe.
    He gave me a very tart reply.
Synonyms edit
  • (of wine: high in acidity): green
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English tart, tarte, from Old French tarte, tartre (flat pastry) (compare Medieval Latin tarta), of unknown origin. Perhaps an alteration of Old French torte, tourte, from Latin turta, perhaps from tŏrta f (twisted), in which case it would be cognate to torta.

 
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Noun edit

tart (plural tarts)

  1. A type of small open pie, or piece of pastry, now typically containing jelly (US) / jam (UK) or conserve, or sometimes other fillings (chocolate, custard, egg, butter, historically even meat or other savory fillings).
  2. A melt (block of wax for use in a tart burner).
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Cantonese: (taat1)
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

From sweetheart or jam tart (attractive woman) by shortening.

Noun edit

tart (plural tarts)

  1. (Britain, slang) A prostitute.
  2. (Britain, slang, derogatory, by extension) Any woman with loose sexual morals.
    • 1950, Roy E. Blick (police inspector), testimony before the United States Congress[1]:
      We know the majority of the places that these tarts will hang out at.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

tart (third-person singular simple present tarts, present participle tarting, simple past and past participle tarted)

  1. To practice prostitution.
  2. To practice promiscuous sex.
  3. To dress garishly, ostentatiously, whorishly, or sluttily.
Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tart

  1. inflection of tarten:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Of uncertain origin. Possibly from Proto-Finno-Ugric *tarttɜ- (to cling to, stick to, get caught),[1][2] compare Proto-Finnic *tarttudak (to stick, adhere; grab, seize).

Verb edit

tart

  1. (heading) To force someone or something to remain in place or in position by counteracting another force.
    1. (transitive) to hold, keep (with locative suffixes or lative suffixes)
      Synonym: fog
      Könyvet tart a kezében.He holds a book in his hand.
    2. (transitive) to support (keep in the same place, withstanding its weight)
      Synonyms: támaszt, megtámaszt, megtart
      Antonym: elenged (to let go)
      A falak tartják a tetőt.The walls support the roof.
    3. (transitive) to keep, keep up, preserve, retain (to hold something in the same status or condition, not letting it change or cease)
      Synonyms: őriz, megőriz
      A hűtő hidegen tartja az ételt.The refrigerator keeps the food cold.
      Tartja az iramot.He/she/it keeps up the pace.
    4. (transitive) to keep (not give up or relinquish)
      Synonyms: őriz, megőriz, megtart
      Tudsz titkot tartani?Can you keep a secret?
    5. (transitive) to keep back, hold back, hinder, detain, retain (optionally with locative suffixes)
      Synonyms: tartóztat, marasztal, hátráltat, akadályoz, gátol, visszatart, visszafog, visszafojt, elfog, megállít
    6. (transitive) to keep, observe, follow (rule, obligation, custom, tradition, or ritual)
      Synonyms: követ, betart, megtart, igazodik
    7. (transitive) to keep (to remain faithful to a given promise, word, bet or wager)
      Synonyms: betart, megtart
      (idiomatic): Tartja a szavát.He keeps his word. (i.e. a promise)
    8. (transitive) to keep, maintain, cultivate, foster, harbor, nurse, nurture, cherish (relationship with any acquaintance, familial relations, or bad feelings, grudge towards someone)
      Synonyms: fenntart, ápol, táplál
  2. (heading) To provide some person or another being with a place to stay or a way of life, supplying them, or to keep, own something temporarily somewhere.
    1. (transitive) to employ, hire, keep, have (someone for regular service)
      Synonyms: alkalmaz, foglalkoztat
      Bejárónőt tart.S/he employs a daily help.
    2. (transitive) to keep, raise, farm (a pet or other animal)
      Synonyms: gondoz, gondoskodik
      Kutyát tart.S/he keeps a dog.
    3. (transitive) to keep, store (to hold something in the same place; with locative suffixes)
      Synonyms: tárol (to store), őriz (to guard), eltesz
      A fontos papírokat a fiókban tartom.I keep the important documents in the drawer.
  3. (heading) To perform an action that takes some time.
    1. (transitive) to have, hold, give, conduct, perform (a lecture, performance, presentation, meeting, etc.; on something: -ról/-ről)
      Synonyms: rendez, szervez
    2. (transitive) to take (a break)
      szünetet tartto take a break
  4. (heading) To believe, deem, consider.
    1. (transitive) to find, think, deem, consider, regard something (with -nak/-nek)
      Synonyms: gondol, vél, lát, ítél, tekint
      Ezt az ötletet jónak tartom.I think this is a good idea. (literally, “I find this idea good.”)
      Saját felelősségemnek tartom.I consider it (as) my own responsibility
    2. (transitive) to esteem, deem, regard, think highly or poorly of (with -ra/-re)
      Synonyms: becsül, értékel
      Sokra tartom ezt az embert.I highly think of this person.
  5. (heading) To go on for a certain time, to extend to a certain limit.
    1. (intransitive, of some program, event etc.) to last, continue, go on, to be in progress (used with -tól/-től-ig)
      Synonyms: folyik, zajlik
      Antonyms: befejeződik, végződik, véget ér (to end), megszakad, félbeszakad (to be interrupted)
      Az előadás délig tart.The lecture goes on until noon. (The lecture ends at noon)
      Tart még a film a tévében?Is the film still playing on TV?
    2. (intransitive) to take up space, extend
      Synonyms: ér, terjed
      A dugó a Petőfi utcától a Kossuth utcáig tart.The traffic jam extends from Petőfi Street up to Kossuth Street.
  6. (heading) To be somewhere in a progress or to go somewhere.
    1. (intransitive) to be at, to have got(ten) to some point (while proceeding, momentarily describing how far a process has gone; used with locative suffixes)
      Synonyms: van, áll, jut(ott)
      A könyv elején tartok.I am at the beginning of the book.
      Hol tartasz a munkával?How far have you got with your work?
    2. (intransitive, slightly literary) to head to some direction, to be bound somewhere (with lative suffixes)
      Synonyms: megy, halad, (of a road, path, etc.) vezet
      Merre tartasz?Where are you headed?
    3. (intransitive, slightly literary) to join or accompany someone (with -val/-vel)
      Synonyms: megy, jön, csatlakozik
      Velünk tartasz?Will you join us?
    4. (intransitive, mathematics) to converge, have limit at (-hoz/-hez/-höz or -ba/-be)
      Synonym: konvergál
      A sorozat 0-hoz tart.The sequence converges to 0.
  7. (heading) To be afraid of or sorry about something.
    1. (intransitive) to fear, to be afraid or apprehensive (of someone or something -tól/-től)
      Synonyms: fél, aggódik
      Tartok a betörőktől.I’m afraid of burglars.
      • 1990, Róbert Hámori, Egérderby, Budapest: Eötvös Kiadó, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 8:
        A dzsip a lépcsőháztól nem messze parkol, balra, ide tessékelnek be, a feszültség azért már oldódik, a rendőrök is érzik, tudják, nincs mitől tartaniuk, épp eléggé elfoglal engem a magam baja, nemhogy szökésre gondoljak.
        (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    2. (intransitive, construed with attól) to be afraid, to be regretful, to be sorry
      Synonyms: sajnál, restell
      Attól tartok, nem tudok ebben segíteni önnek/neked.I am afraid I cannot help you in this matter.
Conjugation edit
Derived terms edit
Compound words

(With verbal prefixes):

Expressions

Etymology 2 edit

tar (bald) +‎ -t (accusative suffix)

Adjective edit

tart

  1. accusative singular of tar

References edit

  1. ^ Entry #1029 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Hungarian Research Centre for Linguistics.
  2. ^ tart in Gerstner, Károly (ed.). Új magyar etimológiai szótár. (’New Etymological Dictionary of Hungarian’). Beta version. Budapest, MTA Nyelvtudományi Intézet / Magyar Nyelvtudományi Kutatóközpont, 2011–2022. (Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungary). Language abbreviations

Further reading edit

  • tart in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish tart, from Proto-Celtic *tartus, from Proto-Indo-European *térstus, from *ters- (dry).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tart m (genitive singular tarta)

  1. thirst
    tart orm.I am thirsty. (literally, “Thirst is on me.”)
    Chuir an liamhás tart air.The ham made him thirsty. (literally, “The ham put thirst on him.”)

Declension edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tart thart dtart
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English teart, from Proto-Germanic *tartaz.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

tart (rare)

  1. Sour, tart; having much acidity.
  2. (Early Middle English) Acute, keen; showing sharpness.
Descendants edit
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

tart

  1. Alternative form of tarte

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse tartr. Doublet of tert.

Noun edit

tart m (definite singular tarten, indefinite plural tarter, definite plural tartene)

  1. (zoology) a small salmon
    Synonym: svele

References edit

Anagrams edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse tartr. Doublet of tert.

Noun edit

tart m (definite singular tarten, indefinite plural tartar, definite plural tartane)

  1. (zoology) a small salmon
    Synonyms: silung, svelung, svele

References edit

Anagrams edit

Old French edit

Adjective edit

tart m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tarde)

  1. late (after the end of a given period)

Adverb edit

tart

  1. late (after the end of a given period)

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Celtic *tartus, from Proto-Indo-European *térstus, from *ters- (dry).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tart m (genitive tarta)

  1. thirst
Inflection edit
Masculine u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative tart tartL tartae
Vocative tart tartL tartu
Accusative tartN tartL tartu
Genitive tartoH, tartaH tarto, tarta tartaeN
Dative tartL tartaib tartaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

·tart

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive perfective prototonic of do·beir

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·tart ·thart ·tart
pronounced with /-d(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Norse edit

Noun edit

tart

  1. accusative singular indefinite of tartr m

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /tart/
  • Rhymes: -art
  • Syllabification: tart

Noun edit

tart

  1. genitive plural of tarta