EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tart, from Old English teart (sharp, rough, severe), from Proto-Germanic *tartaz (rough, sharp, tearing), from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear), from Proto-Indo-European *der- (to flay, split, cleave). Related to Dutch tarten (to defy, challenge, mock), German trotzen (to defy, brave, mock), German zart (delicate, tender), Albanian thartë (sour, acid, sharp).

AdjectiveEdit

tart (comparative tarter, superlative tartest)

  1. Sharp to the taste; acid; sour.
    I ate a very tart apple.
  2. (of wine) high or too high in acidity.
  3. (figuratively) Sharp; keen; severe.
    He gave me a very tart reply.
Derived termsEdit
SynonymsEdit
  • (of wine: high in acidity): green
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Old French tarte (flat pastry).

NounEdit

tart (plural tarts)

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

  1. A type of small open pie, or piece of pastry, containing jelly or conserve; a sort of fruit pie.
Derived termsEdit
  • treacle tart
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From sweetheart or jam tart (attractive woman) by shortening

NounEdit

tart (plural tarts)

  1. (UK, slang) A prostitute.
  2. (UK, slang, derogatory) By extension, any woman with loose sexual morals.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

tart (third-person singular simple present tarts, present participle tarting, simple past and past participle tarted)

  1. To practice prostitution
  2. To practice promiscuous sex
  3. To dress garishly, ostentatiously, whorish,or slutty
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tart

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of tarten
  2. imperative of tarten

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tart

  1. to keep (many different senses overlapping with English, see examples)
    (somewhere): A fontos papírokat a fiókban tartom. - I keep the important documents in the drawer.
    (somehow): A hűtő hidegen tartja az ételt. - The refrigerator keeps the food cold.
    (pet): Kutyát tart. - S/he keeps a dog.
    (idiomatic): Tartja a szavát. - He keeps his word. (i.e. a promise)
  2. to hold
    Könyvet tart a kezében. - He holds a book in his hand.
    A falak tartják a tetőt. - The walls hold the roof.
  3. to take up space or time, extend, to last (-tól/-től ... -ig)
    (in time): Az előadás délig tart. - The lecture goes on until noon. (The lecture ends at noon)
    (in space): A dugó a Petőfi utcától a Kossuth utcáig tart. - The traffic jam extends from the Petőfi Street up until the Kossuth Street.
  4. momentarily describing whether a process is still in progress, and if yes how far it has gone
    A könyv elején tartok. - I am at the beginning of the book.
    Tart még a film a tévében? - Is the film still playing on TV?
  5. to head into a direction
    Merre tartasz? - Where are you headed?
  6. to fear (-tól/-től)
    Tartok a betörőktől. - I'm afraid of burglars.
  7. (mathematics) converge, have limit at (-hoz/-hez/-höz or -ba/-be)
    A sorozat 0-hoz tart. - The sequence converges to 0.

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • (extend): végződik, véget ér (to end)

Derived termsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tart m (genitive tarta)

  1. thirst
    tart orm. — I am thirsty. (lit. "Thirst is on me.")
    Chuir an liamhás tart air. — The ham made him thirsty. (lit. "The ham put thirst on him.")

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tart thart dtart
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tart m (feminine tarde)

  1. late (after the end of a given period)

AdverbEdit

tart

  1. late (after the end of a given period)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

·tart

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive perfective prototonic of do·beir
Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 02:39