See also: Bunk

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: bŭngk, IPA(key): /bʌŋk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋk

Etymology 1Edit

Sense of sleeping berth possibly from Scottish English bunker (seat, bench), origin is uncertain but possibly Scandinavian. Confer Old Swedish bunke (boards used to protect the cargo of a ship). See also boarding, flooring and confer bunch.

NounEdit

bunk (plural bunks)

  1. One of a series of berths or beds placed in tiers.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 6, in Lord Stranleigh Abroad[1]:
      The men resided in a huge bunk house, which consisted of one room only, with a shack outside where the cooking was done. In the large room were a dozen bunks ; half of them in a very dishevelled state, […]
    Jane sleeps in the top bunk, and her little sister Lauren takes the bottom bunk.
  2. (nautical) A built-in bed on board ship, often erected in tiers one above the other.
  3. (military) A cot.
  4. (US) A wooden case or box, which serves for a seat in the daytime and for a bed at night.
  5. (US, dialect) A piece of wood placed on a lumberman's sled to sustain the end of heavy timbers.
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VerbEdit

bunk (third-person singular simple present bunks, present participle bunking, simple past and past participle bunked)

  1. To occupy a bunk.
    Due to bed shortages, Jeff and Paul had to bunk together.
  2. To provide a bunk.

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Etymology 2Edit

Shortened from bunkum, a variant of buncombe, from Buncombe County, North Carolina. See bunkum for more.

NounEdit

bunk (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Bunkum; senseless talk, nonsense.
    What she said about me was total bunk. Don't believe a word

AdjectiveEdit

bunk (not comparable)

  1. (slang) defective, broken, not functioning properly
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Etymology 3Edit

19th century, of uncertain origin; perhaps from previous "to occupy a bunk" meaning, with connotations of a hurried departure, as if on a ship.

VerbEdit

bunk (third-person singular simple present bunks, present participle bunking, simple past and past participle bunked)

  1. (Britain) To fail to attend school or work without permission; to play truant (usually as in 'to bunk off').
    The naughty boys decided to bunk school and visit the comic shop.
  2. (dated) To expel from a school.
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