See also: cót, côt, cốt, and çot

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

cot

  1. (trigonometry) cotangent

SynonymsEdit


EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Hindi खाट (khāṭ), from Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀔𑀝𑁆𑀝𑀸 (khaṭṭā), from Sanskrit खट्वा (khaṭvā, bedstead).

NounEdit

cot (plural cots)

  1. (US) A simple bed, especially one for portable or temporary purposes; a camp bed.
  2. A crib (child's bed).
  3. (nautical, historical) A wooden bed frame, slung by its corners from a beam, in which officers slept before the introduction of bunks.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English cot, cote, from Old English cot and cote (cot, cottage), from Proto-Germanic *kutą, *kutǭ (compare Old Norse kot, Middle High German kūz (execution pit)), from Scythian (compare Avestan 𐬐𐬀𐬙𐬀(kata, chamber)). Cognate to Dutch kot (student room; small homestead). Doublet of cote; more distantly related to cottage.

NounEdit

cot (plural cots)

  1. (archaic) A cottage or small homestead.
    • (Can we date this quote by Goldsmith and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      the sheltered cot, the cultivated farm
    • 1898, Ethna Carbery, "Roddy McCorley" (poem).
      Oh, see the fleet-foot hosts of men who speed with faces wan / From farmstead and from thresher's cot along the banks of Ban
  2. A pen, coop, or similar shelter for small domestic animals, such as sheep or pigeons; a cote.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Irish cot, coit (small boat), from Proto-Celtic *quontio, from Proto-Indo-European *póntoh₁s (path, road), related to Gaulish and Latin ponto. Compare the first element of catboat, which could be a borrowing.[1]

NounEdit

cot (plural cots)

  1. A small, crudely-formed boat.

Etymology 4Edit

From dialectal cot, cote, partly from Middle English cot (matted wool), from Old English *cot, *cotta, from Proto-Germanic *kuttô (woolen fabric, wool covering); and partly from Middle English cot, cote (tunic, coat), from Old French cote, from the same Germanic source (see English coat). Possibly influenced by English cotton.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

cot (plural cots)

  1. A cover or sheath; a fingerstall.
    a roller cot (the clothing of a drawing roller in a spinning frame)
    a cot for a sore finger

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

<references/.


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cubitum. Compare Daco-Romanian cot.

NounEdit

cot n (plural coati or coate or coturi)

  1. elbow

NounEdit

cot m (plural cots or coate or coati)

  1. an old measure, unit of length

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cot (feminine cota, masculine plural cots, feminine plural cotes)

  1. bowed, towards the ground
    • 2002, Albert Sánchez Piñol, chapter 6, in La pell freda, La Campana:
      Reia i reia amb el cap cot, contenint-se a mitges.
      He laughed and laughed with his head down, half restraining himself.

KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Persian جفت(joft).

NounEdit

cot ?

  1. pair

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kutą, *kutan (shed), probably of non-Indo-European origin, but possibly borrowed from Uralic; compare Finnish kota (hut, house) and Hungarian ház (house), both from Proto-Finno-Ugric/Proto-Uralic *kota.[2]

However, compare Dutch and English hut, as well as Old Norse kot, Middle High German kūz (execution pit)), Scytho-Sarmatian *kuta, Avestan 𐬐𐬀𐬙𐬀(kata, chamber).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cot n (nominative plural cotu)

  1. cottage

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: cot

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911), “coit”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language, Stirling, →ISBN, page coit
  2. ^ Kroonen, Guus (2013), “kuta”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 313-14

PicardEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cattus.

NounEdit

cot m (plural cots)

  1. cat

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cubitum. Compare Spanish codo. Doublet of the neological borrowing cubitus.

NounEdit

cot n (plural coate)

  1. elbow

NounEdit

cot n (plural coturi)

  1. corner

NounEdit

cot m (plural coți)

  1. old unit of length, approx. 2 feet

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English coat.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cot f (plural cotiau)

  1. (South Wales) coat

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cot got nghot chot
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “cot”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies