See also: cốt, cót, and çot

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

cot

  1. A symbol for the trigonometric function cotangent.

SynonymsEdit


EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hindi खाट (khāṭ)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cot (plural cots)

  1. (US) A simple bed, especially one for portable or temporary purposes; a camp bed.
  2. (nautical) A wooden bed frame, slung by its corners from a beam, in which officers slept before the introduction of bunks.
  3. A crib (child's bed).
  4. A cover or sheath.
    a roller cot (the clothing of a drawing roller in a spinning frame)
    a cot for a sore finger
  5. A finger cover used to prevent static discharge.
  6. (archaic) A cottage or small homestead.
    • Goldsmith
      the sheltered cot, the cultivated farm
    • 1898, Ethna Carbery, Roddy McCorley (poem).
      Oh, see the fleet-foot hosts of men who speed with faces wan / From farmstead and from thresher's cot along the banks of Ban
  7. A pen, coop, or similar shelter for small domestic animals, such as sheep or pigeons; a cote.
  8. A small, crudely-formed boat.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • cotu

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cubitum. Compare Daco-Romanian cot.

NounEdit

cot

  1. elbow

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kutan (compare Old Norse kot, Middle High German kūz (execution pit)), from Scytho-Sarmatian *kuta (compare Avestan 𐬐𐬀𐬙𐬀 (kata, chamber)).

NounEdit

cot n

  1. cottage

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cubitum.

NounEdit

cot n (plural coate)

  1. elbow

NounEdit

cot n (plural coturi)

  1. corner

NounEdit

cot n (plural coți)

  1. old unit of length, approx. 2 feet

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 22:13