See also: Cade, cadé, cadê, -cade, cad é, and čadě

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /keɪd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪd

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English cade, kad, kod, ultimately of unknown origin.

AdjectiveEdit

cade (not comparable)

  1. (of an animal) abandoned by its mother and reared by hand

NounEdit

cade (plural cades)

  1. An animal brought up or nourished by hand.
    • 1720, John Bulkeley, The Last-Day: Poem in XII Books, page 54:
      Then on the verdrous Bank, where Spices rose, Rowl on the balmy Grass, or smiling play With her young Cade, her caded Lamb with Smiles Answer'd her Love, and lickt her dainty hand.

VerbEdit

cade (third-person singular simple present cades, present participle cading, simple past and past participle caded)

  1. To make a pet of; to coddle, pamper, or spoil.
    • 1874, Pye Henry Chavasse, Counsel to a Mother on the Care and Rearing of her Children[1], third edition, J.&A. Churchill, OCLC 1063427342, page 197:
      Delicacies are thrown away upon a growing youth; they are quite out of place; his appetite does not require pampering, and cading, and coaxing; moreover, a youth who is made to think a great deal of his stomach is sure to grow up an epicure!
    • [1881, Pye Henry Chavasse, The Mental Culture and Training of Children[2], Lindsay & Blakiston, LCCN e11000014, OCLC 7647810, page 118:
      Besides, the more luxury a child has, the more he will require—wants beget wants; until, at length, he will become a poor, wretched, artificial imbecile, fit only to be caded and cottoned up in warm enervating rooms; but totally unfit to be buffeted about—as is good for him—in this rough world of ours.]
    • 1926, Dorothy Rogers, “Miss Podbury's Adventure”, in The Windsor Magazine, volume 63, OCLC 1769919, page 222:
      "He's neither more nor less interesting than any other man, I suppose," replied Miss Podbury drily. "They're all alike, as far as I can see. I can't think what women find in them to make such a fuss about, cading them up and spoiling them in the way they do!"
    • [1911, David Herbert Lawrence, The White Peacock[3], Heinemann, page 142:
      He's a spoiled boy – I believe he keeps a little bit ill so that we can cade him.]
    • 1965 [winter 1941], David Herbert Lawrence, “The Merry-Go-Round”, in Complete plays (Works), W. Heinemann, OCLC 66744058, page 427, originally in Virginia Quarterly Review:
      mr hemstock: Tha'rt cading him a bit, Nurse.
      nurse: It is what will do him good—to be spoiled a while.

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Middle French cade, from Old Occitan cade, from Latin catanum.

NounEdit

cade (plural cades)

  1. Juniperus oxycedrus (western prickly juniper), whose wood yields a tar.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Middle French cade (barrel), from Latin cadus (bottle, jar).

NounEdit

cade (plural cades)

  1. (archaic) A cask or barrel.
    A cade of herrings was a vessel containing 500 herrings, while a cade of sprats contained 1,000.
Usage notesEdit
  • Used in the British Book of Rates for a determinate number of some sort of fish.

ReferencesEdit

1728, Cyclopaedia, a publication in the public domain.

  • cade at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French cade, intruded around 1500 from Old Occitan cade, from Latin catanum.

NounEdit

cade m (plural cades)

  1. western prickly juniper, cade (Juniperus oxycedrus)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French cade, from Latin cadus.

NounEdit

cade m (plural cades)

  1. (archaic) a cask or barrel
  2. (obsolete, revolutionary France) a cubic metre

Etymology 3Edit

Clipped from Occitan pascada.

NounEdit

cade f (plural cades)

  1. a kind of pastry popular in Toulon

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

cade

  1. present of cader
  2. imperative of cader

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈka.de/
  • Rhymes: -ade
  • Hyphenation: cà‧de

VerbEdit

cade

  1. third-person singular present indicative of cadere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

cade

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of cadō

NounEdit

cade

  1. vocative singular of cadus

Northern KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic جَادَّة(jādda).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cade f (Arabic spelling جادە‎)

  1. road, street

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit