English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English ter, terr, tarr, from Old English teoru, from Proto-West Germanic *teru, from Proto-Germanic *terwą (compare Saterland Frisian Taar, West Frisian tarre, tar, Dutch teer, German Teer), from Proto-Indo-European *derwo- (compare Welsh derw (oaks), Lithuanian dervà (pinewood, resin), Russian де́рево (dérevo, tree), Bulgarian дърво́ (dǎrvó, tree)), from *dóru (tree). More at tree.

Noun edit

 
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tar (countable and uncountable, plural tars)

  1. (usually uncountable) A black, oily, sticky, viscous substance, consisting mainly of hydrocarbons derived from organic materials such as wood, peat, or coal.
  2. Coal tar.
  3. (uncountable) A solid residual byproduct of tobacco smoke.
  4. (slang, dated) A sailor, because of the traditional tarpaulin clothes.
    Synonym: Jack Tar
    • 1915, W. McMann, “Our Picture Show”, in Western Evening Herald:
      If there's one man that I admire, that man's a British tar.
    • August 10 1723, Jonathan Swift, To Charles Mordaunt, Earl of Peterborough[2]:
      Shines in all climates like a star; In senates bold, and fierce in war; A land commander, and a tar.
  5. (uncountable) Black tar, a form of heroin.
Derived terms edit
Terms derived from tar (noun)
Translations edit

Verb edit

tar (third-person singular simple present tars, present participle tarring, simple past and past participle tarred)

  1. (transitive) To coat with tar.
  2. (transitive) To besmirch.
    The allegations tarred his name, even though he was found innocent.
    • 1995, Paul Robinson, The Gate Contracts:
      Dr. Sign: In fact, maybe you think I should get credit, but if I do, Dr. Frendall will be scorned. You know why
      Dr. Ellsworth: Yes, I know. Your critics will tar him with the same brush as you.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Abbreviation of tape archive.

Noun edit

tar (plural tars)

  1. (computing) A program for archiving files, common on Unix systems.
  2. (computing) A file produced by such a program.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

tar (third-person singular simple present tars, present participle tarring, simple past and past participle tarred)

  1. (computing, transitive) To create a tar archive.
Antonyms edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

 
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From Persian تار (târ).

 

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

tar (plural tars)

  1. A Persian long-necked, waisted string instrument, shared by many cultures and countries in the Middle East and the Caucasus.
Translations edit
See also edit

Etymology 4 edit

From Arabic طار (ṭār).

Noun edit

tar (plural tars)

  1. A single-headed round frame drum originating in North Africa and the Middle East.
See also edit
References edit

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Noun edit

tar m (plural tari)

  1. donkey

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Latin stāre, present active infinitive of stō. Compare Spanish estar, Aragonese estar, Galician estar, Portuguese estar, Catalan estar.

Verb edit

tar

  1. to be (referring to geographical place)
  2. to be (referring to something temporary)
  3. to be (for use in constructing continuous verb forms)
    tas xugandoyou are playing

Conjugation edit

Impersonal forms
Infinitive tar
Gerund tando
Past participle tao
Personal forms
yo tu él~elli/-a/-o nosotros/-es~nós vosotros/-es~vós ellos/-es
Indicative Present to
toi
tas ta tamos tais tán
Imperfect preterite taba tabes taba tábamos~tábemos tabais~tabeis taben
Perfect preterite tuvi
tevi
tuvisti
tuviesti
tuvo
tevo
tuvimos
tuviemos
tuvistis
tuviestis
tuvieron
Pluperfect preterite tuviera~tuviere tuvieras~tuvieres tuviera~tuviere tuviéramos~tuviéremos tuvierais~tuviereis tuvieran~tuvieren
yo tu él~elli/-a/-o nosotros/-es~nós vosotros/-es~vós ellos/-es
Subjunctive Present tea teas tea teamos teáis tean
Imperfect preterite tuviera~tuviere tuvieras~tuvieres tuviera~tuviere tuviéramos~tuviéremos tuvierais~tuviereis tuvieran~tuvieren
yo tu él~elli/-a/-o nosotros/-es~nós vosotros/-es~vós ellos/-es
Potential Future taré tarás tará taremos taréis tarán
Conditional taría taríes taría taríamos~taríemos taríais~taríeis taríen
- tu vusté nosotros/-es~nós vosotros/-es~vós vustedes
Imperative ta vamos tar tai

Azerbaijani edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Persian تار (târ).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tar (definite accusative tarı, plural tarlar)

  1. tar

Declension edit

    Declension of tar
singular plural
nominative tar
tarlar
definite accusative tarı
tarları
dative tara
tarlara
locative tarda
tarlarda
ablative tardan
tarlardan
definite genitive tarın
tarların
    Possessive forms of tar
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) tarım tarlarım
sənin (your) tarın tarların
onun (his/her/its) tarı tarları
bizim (our) tarımız tarlarımız
sizin (your) tarınız tarlarınız
onların (their) tarı or tarları tarları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) tarımı tarlarımı
sənin (your) tarını tarlarını
onun (his/her/its) tarını tarlarını
bizim (our) tarımızı tarlarımızı
sizin (your) tarınızı tarlarınızı
onların (their) tarını or tarlarını tarlarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) tarıma tarlarıma
sənin (your) tarına tarlarına
onun (his/her/its) tarına tarlarına
bizim (our) tarımıza tarlarımıza
sizin (your) tarınıza tarlarınıza
onların (their) tarına or tarlarına tarlarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) tarımda tarlarımda
sənin (your) tarında tarlarında
onun (his/her/its) tarında tarlarında
bizim (our) tarımızda tarlarımızda
sizin (your) tarınızda tarlarınızda
onların (their) tarında or tarlarında tarlarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) tarımdan tarlarımdan
sənin (your) tarından tarlarından
onun (his/her/its) tarından tarlarından
bizim (our) tarımızdan tarlarımızdan
sizin (your) tarınızdan tarlarınızdan
onların (their) tarından or tarlarından tarlarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) tarımın tarlarımın
sənin (your) tarının tarlarının
onun (his/her/its) tarının tarlarının
bizim (our) tarımızın tarlarımızın
sizin (your) tarınızın tarlarınızın
onların (their) tarının or tarlarının tarlarının

Hungarian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowing from an Oghur language, before the times of the Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin (at the turn of the 9th and 10th centuries),[1] from Proto-Turkic *tāŕ (bald). Cognates include Turkish dazlak (bald), Karakhanid تازْ (tāz, bald), and Middle Mongol [script needed] (tarasun, bald), the latter perhaps a Turkic borrowing too.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

tar (not comparable)

  1. bald
    Synonym: kopasz

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative tar tarok
accusative tart tarokat
dative tarnak taroknak
instrumental tarral tarokkal
causal-final tarért tarokért
translative tarrá tarokká
terminative tarig tarokig
essive-formal tarként tarokként
essive-modal
inessive tarban tarokban
superessive taron tarokon
adessive tarnál taroknál
illative tarba tarokba
sublative tarra tarokra
allative tarhoz tarokhoz
elative tarból tarokból
delative tarról tarokról
ablative tartól taroktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
taré taroké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
taréi tarokéi

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ tar in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further reading edit

  • tar in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Unknown.

Noun edit

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. Alternative spelling of tir (chess pieces).

Etymology 2 edit

Onomatopoeic.

Noun edit

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. (onomatopoeic) whipping sound.

Etymology 3 edit

From Dutch taart, from Middle Dutch tāerte, from Old French tarte.

Noun edit

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. (cooking) a type of cake.
    Synonym: kue tar
Alternative forms edit

Etymology 4 edit

From English tar, from Proto-Germanic *terwą, from Proto-Indo-European *derwo-. Doublet of ter and tir.

Noun edit

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. tar, the solid residual byproduct of tobacco smoke.
Usage notes edit

Other definition of tar translated into ter or tir.

Etymology 5 edit

Noun edit

tar (first-person possessive tarku, second-person possessive tarmu, third-person possessive tarnya)

  1. (colloquial) aphetic form of sebentar.

Further reading edit

Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish do·icc. The imperative is from a related verb, do·airicc.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tar (present analytic tagann, future analytic tiocfaidh, verbal noun teacht, past participle tagtha)

  1. to come
    Tiocfaidh ár lá.
    Our day will come.
  2. to survive, pull through
    Bhí a ndeartháir ar leaba an bháis, ach tháinig sé.
    Their brother was on his deathbed, but he pulled through.
    Bádh a hathair agus tháinig a máthair.
    Her father drowned and her mother survived.

Conjugation edit

Forms based on the stem tig- (e.g. tigim and tig/tigeann) are found in Ulster, North Mayo and parts of Munster; in at least some of these varieties there may also be spontaneous lenition to thig etc. even in environments where no lenition is expected. Forms based on the stem teag- (e.g. teagaim, teagann) are found in parts of Connacht.

The present analytic tig is particularly common in tar le (be able).

The obsolete present subjunctive is now found only in the preposition go dtí (to, toward, up to, until).

Alternative forms of the second-person singular imperative include tair in Munster, teighre in Aran, teara in Connemara, and gabh in Ulster.

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tar thar dtar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Karaim edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *t(i)ār.

Adjective edit

tar

  1. narrow

References edit

  • N. A. Baskakov, S.M. Šapšala, editor (1973), “tar”, in Karaimsko-Russko-Polʹskij Slovarʹ [Karaim-Russian-Polish Dictionary], Moscow: Moskva, →ISBN

Maltese edit

Root
t-j-r
9 terms

Etymology edit

From Arabic طَارَ (ṭāra).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tar (imperfect jtir, verbal noun tajran)

  1. to fly
  2. to be quick

Conjugation edit

    Conjugation of tar
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m tirt tirt tar tirna tirtu taru
f taret
imperfect m ntir ttir jtir ntiru ttiru jtiru
f ttir
imperative tir tiru

Manx edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish do·icc.

Verb edit

tar (verbal noun çheet, simple past haink, future hig, conditional harragh)

  1. to come
    Haink ee er etlan.
    She came by plane.

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

tar

  1. Alternative form of tare (vetch)

Etymology 2 edit

Determiner edit

tar

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) Alternative form of þeir

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Verb edit

tar

  1. present of ta

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

tar

  1. present of ta

Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *taras, from Proto-Indo-European *tr̥h₂és, from the root *terh₂- (to cross).[1]

The voiced variant dar is the original one, since *t in proclitics regularly became d in Old Irish. Tar with a voiceless initial consonant is analogical after its conjugated forms.[2]

Preposition edit

tar (with accusative)

  1. over, across

Inflection edit

Forms combined with the definite article:

  • tarsin (masculine/feminine singular)
  • tarsa (neuter singular)
  • tarsna (plural all genders)

Forms combined with a possessive determiner:

Forms combined with a possessive pronoun:

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Irish: thar
  • Manx: har, harrish
  • Scottish Gaelic: thar

References edit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009) “*taras”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 370
  2. ^ McCone, Kim (1981) “Final /t/ to /d/ after Unstressed Vowels, and an Old Irish Sound Law”, in Ériu[1], volume 32, Royal Irish Academy, →ISSN, →JSTOR, retrieved November 25, 2022, pages 29–44

Further reading edit

Pali edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Sanskrit तॄ (tṝ).

Root edit

tar (Pali name tara)

  1. to cross

Derived terms edit

Verbs
Nouns
Adjectives

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /tar/
  • Rhymes: -ar
  • Syllabification: tar

Noun edit

tar f

  1. genitive plural of tara

Portuguese edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

 
 

Verb edit

tar

  1. (Portugal) Nonstandard spelling of estar.
    • 1983, Manuel da Costa Fontes, Romanceiro da Ilha de São Jorge, Universidade de Coimbra, page 236:
      Eu tou aqui nesta serra
      I’m here in this mountain chain

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Hungarian tár.

Noun edit

tar m (plural taruri)

  1. unit of measurement for weights

Declension edit

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

tar

  1. Romanization of 𒋻 (tar)

Swedish edit

Verb edit

tar

  1. present indicative of ta

Anagrams edit

Yola edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English tar, from Old English teoru, from Proto-West Germanic *teru.

Noun edit

tar

  1. tar
    • 1927, “YOLA ZONG O BARONY VORTH”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 132, line 10:
      Aal haar, an wi eyen lik torches o tar?"
      "All hair, and with eyes like torches of tar,"

References edit

  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 132