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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French caisson, from Italian cassone.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caisson (plural caissons)

  1. (engineering) An enclosure from which water can be expelled, in order to give access to underwater areas for engineering works etc.
    • 2003, Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything, BCA, p. 213:
      Caissons were enclosed dry chambers built on river beds to facilitate the construction of bridge piers.
  2. The gate across the entrance to a dry dock.
  3. (nautical) A floating tank that can be submerged, attached to an underwater object and then pumped out to lift the object by buoyancy; a camel.
  4. (military) A two-wheeled, horse-drawn military vehicle used to carry ammunition (and a coffin at funerals).
    • 1908, Edmund Louis Gruber, “The Caissons Go Rolling Along”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Over hill, over dale / As we hit the dusty trail, / And those caissons go rolling along.
  5. (military) A large box to hold ammunition.
  6. (military) A chest filled with explosive materials, used like a mine.
  7. (architecture) A coffer.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan caisson, from caissa; synchronically analysable as caisse +‎ -on.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caisson m (plural caissons)

  1. box

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

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