See also: cámel, camèl, and Camel

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English camel, through Old English camel and Old Northern French camel (Old French chamel, modern French chameau), from Latin camēlus, from Ancient Greek κάμηλος (kámēlos), from a Semitic source, ultimately from Proto-Semitic *gamal-; compare Arabic جَمَل (jamal), Hebrew גמל (gamál), Aramaic ܓܡܠܐ (gamlā), Coptic ϭⲁⲙⲟⲩⲗ (camoul).

Noun

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camel (plural camels)

  1. A beast of burden, much used in desert areas, of the genus Camelus.
    Synonym: (India (Anglo-Indian), Australia, colloquial) oont
    Hypernym: camelid
    Hyponyms: Bactrian camel, dromedary
    Coordinate terms: llama, guanaco, alpaca, vicuna, vicuña; more at Category:en:Camelids
  2. A light brownish color, like that of a camel (also called camel brown).
    camel:  
  3. Loaded vessels lashed tightly, one on each side of another vessel, and then emptied to reduce the draught of the ship in the middle.
  4. (ethnic slur, offensive, derogatory, slang) A person of Middle Eastern origin.
Derived terms
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|cameleopard |camelestrian |camelopard |camelry |camel toe |a camel is a horse designed by a committee|a camel is a horse made by a committee|a camel is a horse made by committee|Arabian camel|camel case|camel clutch|camel driver|camel flu|camel jockey|camel meat|camel rider|camel spider|camel through the eye of a needle|camel-hair brush|camel-jockey|dromedary camel|it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God|lower camel case|milch camel|milk camel|one-camel town|sleep camel|upper camel case|young camel}}

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Descendants
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  • Coeur d'Alene: keemel
  • Eastern Arrernte: kamule
  • Tsonga: kamela
Translations
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Adjective

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camel (not comparable)

  1. Of a light brown color like that of a camel.
    • 1999, New Woman, volume 29, page 212:
      [] try to select accessories that are in the same color family as your coat," says millinery designer Patricia Underwood. To pick up the weave of a brown tweed jacket, for instance, choose a camel hat and black gloves.
Descendants
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Etymology 2

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From Afrikaans kameel.

Noun

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camel (plural camels)

  1. (South Africa, obsolete) Synonym of giraffe

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Northern French camel, cameil, from Latin camēlus. Some forms are from or influenced by Old French chamel, chamoil.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkamɛl/, /kaˈmɛːl/, /kaˈmæi̯l/
  • (From Central Old French) IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃamɛl/, /t͡ʃaˈmɛːl/, /t͡ʃaˈmæi̯l/

Noun

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camel (plural cameles)

  1. camel (mammal of the genus Camelus)

Descendants

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References

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Old French

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Etymology

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See chamel.

Noun

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camel oblique singularm (oblique plural cameus, nominative singular cameus, nominative plural camel)

  1. (Old Northern French, Anglo-Norman) camel

Tocharian B

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Etymology

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An action noun from täm- (be born). Compare Tocharian A cmol.

Noun

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camel n

  1. birth, rebirth
    alyek cmelne ṣpä ñäkcye cmetsi śaiṣṣene
    and to be born in the divine world in another birth