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See also: cámel, camèl, and Camel

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English camel, through Old Northern French camel (Old French chamel, modern French chameau), from Latin camēlus, from Ancient Greek κάμηλος (kámēlos), from Proto-Semitic *gamal-; compare Arabic جَمَل (jamal) and Hebrew גמל (gamál).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

camel (plural camels)

  1. A beast of burden, much used in desert areas, of the genus Camelus.
  2. A light brownish color, like that of a camel.
    camel colour:  
  3. Loaded vessels lashed tightly, one on each side of a another vessel, and then emptied to reduce the draught of the ship in the middle.

SynonymsEdit

  • (mammal): oont (India (Anglo-Indian), Australia, colloquial)

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

camel (not comparable)

  1. Of a light brown color like that of a camel.
    • 1999, New Woman, volume 29, page 212:
      [] try to select accessories that are in the same color family as your coat," says millinery designer Patricia Underwood. To pick up the weave of a brown tweed jacket, for instance, choose a camel hat and black gloves.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

See chamel.

NounEdit

camel m (oblique plural cameus, nominative singular cameus, nominative plural camel)

  1. (Old Northern French, Anglo-Norman) camel

Tocharian BEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Compare Tocharian A cmol.

NounEdit

camel

  1. birth